Drought Information Statement
Issued by NWS Aberdeen, SD

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AXUS73 KABR 230934
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MNC011-155-SDC013-017-021-025-029-031-037-039-041-045-049-051-057-
059-065-069-075-085-089-091-107-109-115-117-119-129-250945-

Drought Information Statement
National Weather Service Aberdeen SD
434 AM CDT Sun Jul 23 2017 /334 AM MDT Sun Jul 23 2017/

...DROUGHT CONDITIONS CONTINUE TO EXPAND ON THE LATEST RELEASE OF THE
DROUGHT MONITOR...

SYNOPSIS...

Hot conditions thus far in July, along with mostly dry conditions
through the first half of the month, have led to an expansion of the
drought across South Dakota. Within the past week, episodes of
strong thunderstorms with heavy rain have affected parts of northern
South Dakota, but central South Dakota including the Pierre region
has largely missed out on beneficial rain. Heavy rain over northern
South Dakota may have slowed the continued worsening of the drought,
but for many in the agricultural community, it was already too late.

D3 (Extreme) drought counties: Corson, eastern Dewey, Sully, Potter,
Walworth, Campbell, western McPherson, western Edmunds, extreme
western Faulk, extreme northwest Hyde.

D2 (Severe) drought counties: Jones, Lyman, Buffalo, Stanley,
Hughes, western Dewey, Hyde, Hand, Faulk, Edmunds, eastern McPherson,
southwestern Brown, western Spink.

D1 (Moderate) drought counties: Brown, eastern Spink, Clark,
Marshall, Day, western Hamlin, western Grant, western Roberts,
Codington.

D0 (Abnormally dry) counties: eastern Hamlin, Deuel, eastern Grant,
eastern Roberts, Traverse, Big Stone.

SUMMARY OF IMPACTS...

STATE AND LOCAL ACTIONS:
South Dakota State University Extension has partnered with USDA/Farm
Services Agency to hold a handful of meetings across South Dakota to
discuss the current drought conditions and available resources with
ag producers. Senator John Thune`s request to the USDA to open up CRP
land for haying and grazing was honored. On Thursday, 235,000 acres
were released for emergency haying and grazing. Regulations were also
eased for grass waterways, wetlands restoration, farmable wetlands
and related buffers, prairie farmable wetlands and duck nesting
habitat.

SOIL MOISTURE CONDITIONS:
Calculated soil moisture anomalies from July 21st show deficits
across central South Dakota ranging from 80mm to 120mm, which
includes much of the D2 and D3 drought areas. The July 17th USDA
South Dakota Crop Progress and Condition report indicates topsoil
moisture 85 percent short or very short, which is up 30 percent from
about a month ago. Subsoil moisture is rated 79 percent short or very
short. This is about 25 percent higher than a month ago.

AGRICULTURAL IMPACTS:
Soybeans are showing thin stands, slow growth, and small size. Corn
growth is slowing down rapidly in hard hit areas due to drought and
heat stress. Water samples in stock ponds are testing high in Total
Dissolved Solids. Cattle sales continue across the region.

The latest South Dakota Crop Progress and Condition report indicates
spring wheat at 74 percent poor or very poor. Oats condition was at
52 percent poor or very poor. Barley was rated 83 percent poor or
very poor. Corn condition was rated 38 percent poor or very poor.
Alfalfa was rated 80 percent poor or very poor. As for pasture and
range condition, it was rated 68 percent poor or very poor. Stock
water supplies are rated 57 percent short or very short.

RIVER AND STREAM FLOW CONDITIONS:
Seven-day average stream flows compared to historical stream flow is
below normal at the Bad River near Fort Pierre, the White River near
Oacoma, the James River near Stratford, the Maple River near the
ND/SD state line, and the Little Minnesota River near Peever. Much
below average stream flow was observed at the Big Sioux River at
Watertown.

FIRE DANGER IMPACTS:
Several counties across South Dakota still have burn bans in place.
The Grassland Fire Danger has reached HIGH or VERY HIGH more
frequently as fine fuels continue to dry out. Grass fires continue
to be reported across the region.

CLIMATE SUMMARY...

Much of northeast South Dakota as well as central South Dakota in the
Pierre region have only seen 25 to 50 percent of normal precipitation
in the past 30 days. A few pockets within these areas have only seen
10 to 25 percent of normal. Looking back over the past 90 days, much
of central and northern South Dakota have only seen 50 to 75 percent
of normal precipitation. Pierre has only recorded 0.12 inches of
precipitation so far in July.

Temperatures for the month of July have been hot, which has
accelerated the deteriorating conditions. Average temperatures are
about 3 to 6 degrees above normal across central South Dakota.

PRECIPITATION/TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK...

The 8 to 14 day outlook issued on July 22nd from the Climate
Prediction Center is calling for near normal temperatures with below
normal precipitation. Both the 1-month and 3-month outlooks call for
above normal temperatures and equal chances for above or below normal
precipitation.

HYDROLOGIC SUMMARY AND OUTLOOK...

The latest Probabilistic Hydrologic Outlook from the National Weather
Service in Aberdeen shows a less than 20 percent chance for any of
the rivers across the County Warning Area reaching minor flood stage
in the next 90 days.

NEXT ISSUANCE DATE...

This product will be updated around August 23rd or sooner if
necessary in response to significant changes in conditions.

&&

RELATED WEB SITES...

Additional information on current drought conditions may be found at
the following web addresses:

US Drought Monitor...http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu
National Integrated Drought Information System...http://www.drought.gov
NOAA Drought Page...http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/Drought
High Plains Regional Climate Center...https://hprcc.unl.edu
Local Weather Information...http://www.weather.gov/abr
USDA Crop Information...http://www.nass.usda.gov/index.asp
South Dakota State Climate Office...https://climate.sdstate.edu
SDSU Extension...http://igrow.org
Drought Impact Reporter...http://droughtreporter.unl.edu/map

ADDITIONAL RIVER INFORMATION...

National Weather Service...http://water.weather.gov
US Geological Survey...https://www.usgs.gov/water
US Army Corps of Engineers...http://www.usace.army.mil

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

The Drought Monitor is a multi-agency effort involving the National
Weather Service and National Centers for Environmental Information,
the USDA, state and regional center climatologists and the National
Drought Mitigation Center. Information for this statement has been
gathered from NWS and FAA observation sites, state cooperative
extension services, the USDA, USACE and USGS.

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS...

If you have questions or comments about this Drought Information
Statement, please contact:

National Weather Service
Travis Tarver
824 Brown County 14S
Aberdeen SD 57401
Phone...605-225-0519
travis.tarver@noaa.gov

$$
TMT


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