Drought Information Statement
Issued by NWS La Crosse, WI

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DROUGHT INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
815 AM CDT Fri Oct 13 2017

...Rains Alleviate the Drought...

SYNOPSIS...

From October 3 through October 10, 2 to 4 inches of rain
fell north of Interstate 90 and 3 to 6 inches fell south
of Interstate 90.  The heaviest rain fell at Mabel MN
(6.66 inches - Fillmore County), NWS La Crosse (5.82 inches -
La Crosse County), and near Waucoma IA (5.25 inches -
Fayette County).

This rain cut the rainfall deficits since August 1st
in half.  Due to this, the moderate (D1) and severe (D2)
drought was removed in the October 10th U.S. Drought Monitor.
With many areas still reporting 2 to 4 inch rainfall deficits,
these areas remain abnormally dry (D0).

SUMMARY OF IMPACTS...

LOCAL AREA AFFECTED.

Abnormally dry (D0) across all or parts of Allamakee,
Clayton, Fayette, and Winneshiek counties in northeast Iowa;
Fillmore, Houston, Mower, Olmsted, and Winona counties
in southeast Minnesota; and Adams, Buffalo, Clark, Crawford,
Grant, Jackson, La Crosse, Jackson, Juneau, Monroe, Richland,
Taylor, Trempealeau, and Vernon counties in western Wisconsin.

STATE /LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACTIONS.

No know actions are currently taking place.

SOIL MOISTURE CONDITIONS.

Northeast Iowa...

Topsoil moisture levels rated 9 percent very short,
16 percent short, 59 percent adequate and 16 percent surplus.

Subsoil moisture levels rated 16 percent very short,
23 percent short, 57 percent adequate and 4 percent surplus.

Minnesota...

Topsoil moisture supplies rated 0 percent very short,
3 percent short, 69 percent adequate and 28 percent surplus.

Subsoil moisture supplies rated 2 percent very short,
6 percent short, 73 percent adequate and 19 percent surplus.

Wisconsin...

Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 3 percent very short,
18 percent short, 74 percent adequate and 5 percent surplus.

Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 4 percent very short,
16 percent short, 75 percent adequate and 5 percent surplus.

AGRICULTURE IMPACTS.

Iowa...

According to USDA`s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Rain
throughout most of the week prevented Iowa farmers from spending
much time in their fields during the week ending October 8, 2017.
There were only 2.6 days suitable for fieldwork, the lowest this
season since the last week in May. Activities for the week included
harvesting corn for grain and soybeans, hauling and drying grain,
seeding cover crops, and applying manure.

Pasture condition improved for the second week in a row to 25
percent good to excellent. Pastures have greened up and ponds are
starting to fill. Livestock conditions were reported as good, but
feedlots are muddy from the recent rains.

It was a very wet week across most of Iowa excepting small portions
of east central and southeast Iowa. A very slow moving cold front
was the focus for two extended periods of rainfall. The first
episode began in western Iowa on Sunday (1st) afternoon and finally
departed southeast Iowa on Wednesday (4th) morning. The second
period of rain moved into western Iowa on Thursday (5th) morning and
finally exited northeast Iowa on Saturday (7th) afternoon. Both rain
periods brought the heavier and more persistent rainfall to western
sections of the state. Weekly rain totals varied from 0.32 inches at
Bettendorf to 6.94 inches north of New Market in Taylor County. Rain
totals of 3 to 5 inches were common over the northwest one-half of
Iowa while amounts were mostly under one inch east of a Dubuque/Iowa
City/Fairfield line. The statewide average rain amount was 3.05
inches while normal for the week is 0.66 inches. A higher statewide
average rain total was last recorded for the week ending July 3,
2014.

Meanwhile temperatures were above normal statewide excepting
portions of northwest Iowa on Wednesday when Spencer Airport
recorded a morning low temperature of 38 degrees.  Highest
temperatures were recorded across southeastern Iowa on Monday (2nd)
with 88 degrees readings at Burlington, Indianola, Iowa City,
Oskaloosa and Ottumwa. Temperatures for the week as a whole averaged
4 to 6 degrees above normal over the northwest and 8 to 10 degrees
above normal over the southeast with a statewide average of 7.9
degrees above normal.

Minnesota...

According to USDA`s National Agricultural Statistics Service during
the week ending October 8, 2017, continued soggy field conditions
further delayed soybean harvest, which was still lagging behind the
5-year average pace, and hampered the corn for grain harvest.  There
were only 2.3 days suitable for fieldwork, the least number of days
since the 1.7 days during the week ending April 30.  Despite wet
conditions sunflower harvest got underway. Harvest continued for
corn silage, dry beans, potatoes, and sugarbeets.

Pasture condition declined slightly to 53 percent good to excellent.

Wisconsin...

According to USDA`s National Agricultural Statistics Service during
the week ending October 8, 2017, there were 4.7 days suitable for
fieldwork.  Widespread rains slowed fieldwork this week, but aided
in replenishing soil moisture levels.  Reporters commented that
recent dry weather has pushed grain moisture levels down, even
though the state has not yet experienced a killing frost.  The corn
silage harvest was racing toward completion, and soybeans were
coming off fields in many areas.  Winter wheat seeding and spreading
manure were going strong as fields were cleared.  Wheat continued to
emerge, boosted by a needed shot of rain.

Here are selected quotes from Farm Reporters and County Ag Agents:

In Buffalo County, significant rainfall last week throughout the
county.  Some parts received 2.5-3.5 inches.  Ground is saturated on
moderate to heavier soils.

In Clark County, corn silage is the crop coming off the field this
week as moistures are coming in the range for multiple storage
types.  Granted, depending on planting date there is a wide range of
moisture.  Some soybeans are being harvested as some are just
turning color and dropping leaves.  A couple more weeks without a
killing freeze will get this year`s corn mature for grain.  Drier
weather has slowed growth of pasture and if farmers don`t have
stockpiled forage, stored feed may be required.  A lot of pumpkins
and apples at the roadside stands.

In Vernon County, lots of rain last week - 4 days out of 7 days.
Received 2.5 inches in one day alone in parts of the county.

FIRE DANGER HAZARDS.

As of the morning of October 10th, there was low fire dangers
across northeast Iowa, southeast Minnesota, and western Wisconsin.

As a reminder, citizens should always check with local officials
in their area before undertaking any outside burning.  Citizens
are liable for damages and suppression costs of any wildfire
they may start.

RIVER AND STREAM FLOW CONDITIONS.

The rivers in northeast Iowa, southeast Minnesota, and western
Wisconsin are currently running near to above normal.

CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY...

Since August 1, the rainfall deficits range from 2 to 4 inches
across much of northeast Iowa, southeast Minnesota, and western
Wisconsin.

PRECIPITATION/TEMPERATURE OUTLOOKS...


From October 13th through October 17th, temperatures will average
near normal and precipitation will average above normal.  During
this time frame, the daily average temperatures range from 46 to 51
degrees and the normal precipitation is around a third of an inch.

Beyond this time frame the 8 to 14 day forecast (October 18th
through October 24th) from the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) calls
for above-normal temperatures and precipitation.  During this time
frame, the daily average temperatures range from 43 to 48 degrees
and the normal precipitation is around a half inch.

The CPC seasonal outlook for November 2017 through January 2018
calls for enhanced chances of above-normal temperatures across the
eastern and southern portions of Wisconsin and Iowa.  Elsewhere in
the Upper Mississippi River Valley there are equal chances for above-
, near-, and below-normal temperatures.  There are no clear climate
signals for precipitation across the Upper Mississippi River Valley;
thus, there are equal chances for above-, near-, and below-normal
precipitation.

NEXT ISSUANCE DATE...

This product will be updated on Thursday, October 19th.

&&

.RELATED WEB SITES...

LOCAL DROUGHT SITE...
   https://www.weather.gov/arx/drought
LOCAL DROUGHT MONITORING SITE...
   https://www.weather.gov/arx/droughtmonitoring
U.S. DROUGHT MONITOR...
   http://www.drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html
NIDIS...
   http://www.drought.gov
CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...
   http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/
MIDWESTERN REGIONAL CLIMATE CENTER (MRCC)...
  http://mrcc.isws.illinois.edu/
ADDITIONAL RIVER INFORMATION...
     NWS - http://water.weather.gov/precip/index.php?
           location_type=wfo&location_name=ARX
     US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY - http://water.usgs.gov/
     US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS -
           http://www.mvr.usace.army.mil/

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

The Drought Monitor is a multi-agency effort involving
NOAA`s National Weather Service and National Climatic Data
Center, the USDA, state and regional center climatologists
and the National Drought Mitigation Center.  Information
for this statement has been gathered from NWS and FAA
observation sites, state Cooperative Extension Services
and the US Army Corps of Engineers and USGS.

.QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS...

If you have any questions or comments about this Drought
Information Statement, please contact the NWS La Crosse at:

E-mail: nws.lacrosse@noaa.gov
Telephone: 608-784-8275

The Climate focal point at the NWS La Crosse is Jeff Boyne.

$$

BOYNE



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