Drought Information Statement
Issued by NWS La Crosse, WI

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AXUS74 KARX 211100
DGTARX
IAZ008>011-018-019-029-030-MNZ079-086>088-094>096-WIZ017-029-
032>034-041>044-053>055-061-281159-

DROUGHT INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
600 AM CDT Thu Sep 21 2017

...Drought Expands...

SYNOPSIS...

Since August 1st, very little rain has fallen along and south
of the Interstate 90 corridor.  Rainfall deficits during this
time frame range from 3 to 6 inches.  Due to this, the moderate
(D1) drought has expanded across southwest and west-central
Wisconsin, northeast Iowa, and southeast Minnesota.

In the September 19th release of the U.S. Drought Monitor,
extreme (D3) drought was found in south-central and southeast
Iowa.

Severe (D2) drought was located in northwest Minnesota and
a small portion of northeast Iowa.

Moderate (D1) drought was found in southeast Minnesota, southwest
and southeast Wisconsin, central Illinois, south-central Lower
Michigan, and central and northwest Iowa.

Abnormally dry (D0) conditions were found across southern
Lower Michigan, much of Illinois Illinois, southwest and
north-central Iowa,south-central Minnesota, and central
Wisconsin.

SUMMARY OF IMPACTS...

LOCAL AREA AFFECTED.

Moderate (D1) to severe (D2) drought across Allamakee County
in northeast Iowa and Houston County in southeast Minnesota.

Moderate (D1) drought across Crawford County in southwest
Wisconsin.

Abnormally dry (D0)) to severe (D2) drought across
Winneshiek County in northeast Iowa.

Abnormally dry (D0) to moderate drought (D1) across all
or portions of Clayton, Fayette, and Howard counties in
northeast Iowa; Fillmore and Winona counties in southeast
Minnesota; and Grant, La Crosse, Monroe, and Vernon
counties in western Wisconsin.

Abnormally dry (D0) across all or parts of Chickasaw,
Floyd, and Mitchell counties in northeast Iowa;  Mower
and Olmsted counties in southeast Minnesota; and Adams,
Buffalo, Clark, Jackson, Juneau, Richland, and
Trempealeau counties in western Wisconsin.

STATE /LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACTIONS.

No know actions are currently taking place.

SOIL MOISTURE CONDITIONS.

Northeast Iowa...

Topsoil moisture levels rated 21 percent very short,
30 percent short, 49 percent adequate and 0 percent
surplus.

Subsoil moisture levels rated 20 percent very short,
34 percent short, 46 percent adequate and 0 percent
surplus.

Minnesota...

Topsoil moisture supplies rated 2 percent very short,
16 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 4 percent
surplus.

Subsoil moisture supplies rated 4 percent very short,
15 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 3 percent
surplus.

Wisconsin...

Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 4 percent very
short, 17 percent short, 77 percent adequate and
2 percent surplus.

Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 2 percent very short,
12 percent short, 83 percent adequate and 3 percent surplus.

AGRICULTURE IMPACTS.

Iowa...

According to USDA`s National Agricultural Statistics
Service It was mostly dry in Iowa with above normal
temperatures for the week ending September 17, 2017.
Statewide there were 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork.
With increased heat and little moisture, crops matured
rapidly in the past week. Activities for the week
included seeding cover crops, spreading manure, harvesting
seed corn, chopping corn silage, and hauling grain.

Pasture conditions worsened over the past week with
47 percent poor to very poor.

It was a warm week across Iowa with temperatures
averaging from one degree above normal southeast
to 6 to 8 degrees above normal over the north and
west. Temperature extremes varied from a 39 degree
low at Lowden in Cedar County on Monday (11th) morning
to highs of 94 degrees at Des Moines and Perry on
Friday (15th).

It was very dry through the workweek with widespread
rain finally arriving over the weekend.  Nearly all
of the week`s rain fell between Friday (15th) morning
and Sunday (17th) morning.  The statewide average
precipitation amount was 0.68 inches while the normal
for the week is 0.79 inches.

Minnesota...

According to USDA`s National Agricultural Statistics
Service during the week ending September 17, 2017,
warm conditions aided maturity of corn and soybeans
and contributed to a rapid harvest pace of dry edible
beans.  There were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork.
Some areas reported fall tillage delays due to dry
conditions. Harvest continued for corn silage,
sugarbeets, potatoes, and alfalfa hay.

Pasture condition declined to 54 percent good to excellent.

Wisconsin...

According to USDA`s National Agricultural Statistics
Service during the week ending September 17, 2017,
there were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork for the
week.  Dry conditions continued this week, with
southern Wisconsin receiving very little precipitation,
and only a few light showers in the north. Temperatures,
however, were well above normal with daytime highs in
the upper 80s.  This burst of heat pushed corn and
soybeans toward maturity and allowed many farmers to
make hay.  Reporters in the northern portions of the
state commented that corn plant moistures were still
too high to chop silage.  Silage harvest was going
strong in the southern portions of the state.  Some
reporters there noted that conditions have gotten
unfavorably dry and rain is now needed.

Pasture condition was 63 percent good to excellent,
9 percentage points less than last week.

Here are selected quotes from Farm Reporters and
County Ag Agents:

In Clark County. it was a dry week with some growing
degree days, unusual for September. Corn needs some
heat to finish. Speaking with some farmers, corn silage
harvest is still a couple weeks away. Beginning to see
some corn dent, but well behind normal. Soybeans are
changing quickly. Some fields showing color change and
a day later the whole field has changed as the grain
is maturing and drying down. Did see some corn silage
harvested, but very limited as moistures are near
80 percent from reports I`ve received. Most of the
oats have been harvested with below average yield
and light test weight a common theme.

In Monroe County, crops on sandy soils are really
shutting down due to dry weather.

FIRE DANGER HAZARDS.

As of the morning of September 19th, moderate fire
danger was reported in Buffalo, Clark, Crawford,
Grant, Jackson, La Crosse, Monroe, Richland,
Trempealeau, and Vernon counties in western Wisconsin.

Low fire danger was reported across northeast Iowa;
southeast Minnesota; and in Adams, Juneau, and Taylor
counties in western Wisconsin.

As a reminder, citizens should always check with local
officials in their area before undertaking any outside
burning.  Citizens are liable

RIVER AND STREAM FLOW CONDITIONS.

Normal flows continue along rivers and streams in
northeast Iowa, southeast Minnesota, and western
Wisconsin.

CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY...

Since August 1, the rainfall deficits have ranged
from 3 to 6 inches along and south of the Interstate
90 corridor.

PRECIPITATION/TEMPERATURE OUTLOOKS...

From September 21st through September 26th,
temperatures will average above normal and precipitation
will average below normal.  During this time frame, the
daily average temperatures range from 55 to 60 degrees
and the normal precipitation is around 6 tenths of an inch.

Beyond this time frame the 8 to 14 day forecast (September
27th through October 3rd) from the Climate Prediction
Center (CPC) calls for below-normal temperatures and
near-normal precipitation.  During this time frame,
the daily average temperatures range from 52 to 57 degrees
and the normal precipitation is around 7 tenths of an inch.

The CPC seasonal outlook for October through December
calls for enhanced chances of above-normal temperatures
and equal chances of above-, near-, and below-normal
precipitation across the Upper Mississippi River Valley.

NEXT ISSUANCE DATE...

This product will be updated on Thursday, September 28th.

&&

.RELATED WEB SITES...

LOCAL DROUGHT SITE...
   https://www.weather.gov/arx/drought
LOCAL DROUGHT MONITORING SITE...
   https://www.weather.gov/arx/droughtmonitoring
U.S. DROUGHT MONITOR...
   http://www.drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html
NIDIS...
   http://www.drought.gov
CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...
   http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/
MIDWESTERN REGIONAL CLIMATE CENTER (MRCC)...
  http://mrcc.isws.illinois.edu/
ADDITIONAL RIVER INFORMATION...
     NWS - http://water.weather.gov/precip/index.php?
           location_type=wfo&location_name=ARX
     US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY - http://water.usgs.gov/
     US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS - http://www.mvr.
                                  usace.army.mil/

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

The Drought Monitor is a multi-agency effort involving
NOAA`s National Weather Service and National Climatic Data
Center, the USDA, state and regional center climatologists
and the National Drought Mitigation Center.  Information
for this statement has been gathered from NWS and FAA
observation sites, state Cooperative Extension Services
and the US Army Corps of Engineers and USGS.

.QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS...

If you have any questions or comments about this Drought
Information Statement, please contact the NWS La Crosse at:

E-mail: nws.lacrosse@noaa.gov
Telephone: 608-784-8275

The Climate focal point at the NWS La Crosse is Jeff Boyne.

$$

BOYNE



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