Climatological Report (Monthly)
Issued by NWS Marquette, MI

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CXUS53 KMQT 021436
CLMMQT

CLIMATE REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MARQUETTE MI
1035 AM EDT THU OCT 2 2014

...WEST AND CENTRAL UPPER MICHIGAN CLIMATE SUMMARY FOR 2013...

...COOLEST YEAR SINCE 1996 AT MOST PLACES...
...WET WITH ABOVE NORMAL CALENDAR YEAR SNOWFALL...
...GREAT LAKES WATER LEVELS RECOVER CLOSER TO NORMAL...

SINCE A DEEP UPPER TROUGH DOMINATED THE GREAT LAKES MUCH OF THE TIME
DURING 2013...ABOVE NORMAL ANNUAL PRECIPITATION WAS THE RULE ACROSS
UPPER MICHIGAN...WITH MANY LOCATIONS EXPERIENCING A TOP 10 WETTEST
CALENDAR YEAR. IN FACT...2013 IS THE WETTEST CALENDAR YEAR ON RECORD
AT IRONWOOD AND MANISTIQUE. THE 2013 PRECIPITATION TOTAL OF 53.46
INCHES AT IRONWOOD WAS ALMOST 19 INCHES ABOVE THE MEAN AND  150
PERCENT OF NORMAL. WHILE PRECIPITATION OVER THE CENTRAL FROM
MARQUETTE TO IRON MOUNTAIN WERE ALSO ABOVE NORMAL...THE YEARLY
TOTALS WERE NOT AS EXCESSIVE AS TO THE WEST AND EAST.

ALTHOUGH THERE WERE SOME WARM PERIODS MAINLY DURING THE FIRST HALF
OF JANUARY AND FROM JULY INTO OCTOBER...THE REST OF 2013 FEATURED
COOLER OR COLDER THAN NORMAL WEATHER MORE OFTEN THAN NOT UNDER THE
PERSISTENT UPPER TROUGH. THE COLDEST PERIODS WERE THE SECOND HALF OF
JANUARY THROUGH THE FIRST HALF OF MAY AND THEN AGAIN LATE NOVEMBER
THROUGH DECEMBER. THE RESULT WAS A MEAN ANNUAL TEMPERATURE FROM 37
TO 42 DEGREES...ABOUT 1 TO 2.5 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL. AT MANY
LOCATIONS...2013 WAS THE COOLEST YEAR SINCE 1996 AND EVEN AMONG THE
TOP TEN COOLEST ON RECORD AT A FEW PLACES. WHAT MADE THE YEAR SEEM
EVEN COOLER WAS THE SHARP CONTRAST WITH THE WARMTH THAT PREVAILED
DURING MUCH OF 2012...WHEN MANY PLACES EXPERIENCED ONE OF THE TOP
FIVE WARMEST YEARS ON RECORD.

SINCE A GOOD DEAL OF THE HEAVY PRECIPITATION FELL DURING THE COLDER
MONTHS...ANNUAL SNOWFALL WAS ALSO WELL ABOVE AVERAGE AT MOST PLACES
IN 2013 AND THE HIGHEST ON RECORD AT MUNISING AND NEWBERRY...WHERE
THE OBSERVED ANNUAL TOTAL OF 222.7 INCHES IS OVER 90 INCHES ABOVE
AND ALMOST 170 PERCENT OF NORMAL. MANY PLACES OVER THE KEWEENAW SAW
OVER 300 INCHES OF THE WHITE STUFF IN 2013...INCLUDING 306.9 INCHES
AT THE HOUGHTON COUNTY AIRPORT...A TOTAL THAT IS ALMOST 100 INCHES
ABOVE THE 30-YEAR CALENDAR YEAR AVERAGE. AS WAS THE CASE WITH ANNUAL
PRECIPITATION...SNOWFALL OVER THE CENTRAL FROM MARQUETTE TO IRON
MOUNTAIN WERE ALSO ABOVE AVERAGE BUT NOT AS SIGNIFICANTLY SO AS TO
THE WEST AND
EAST.
____________________________________________________________________
                    ...SOME 2013 SUPERLATIVES...

HIGHEST CALENDAR YEAR SNOWFALL...382.0 INCHES AT ATLANTIC MINE IN
                                  HOUGHTON COUNTY

GREATEST SNOW DEPTH...62 INCHES NEAR GRAND MARAIS IN ALGER COUNTY
                       ON 3/21

LOWEST SNOWFALL...63.2 INCHES AT MENOMINEE

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION...53.46 INCHES AT IRONWOOD

LOWEST PRECIPITATION...28.80 INCHES AT NORWAY IN DICKINSON COUNTY

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...95 AT MUNISING ON 7/16 AND THEN AGAIN AT
                       BARAGA AND ONTONAGON ON 8/25

LOWEST TEMPERATURE...-28 AT CLARKSBURG-CHAMPION IN MARQUETTE COUNTY
                      ON 2/4 AND STAMBAUGH IN IRON COUNTY ON 2/17
____________________________________________________________________
NWS MARQUETTE STATISTICS /RECORD 1961 TO PRESENT/

...10TH WETTEST YEAR...
...11TH HIGHEST CALENDAR YEAR SNOW...
...14TH COOLEST YEAR...

                                2013 /2012/  1981-2010      2013
                                 OBSERVED      NORMAL    DEPARTURE
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  38.6 /43.9/     40.1        -1.5

ANNUAL AVERAGE HIGH TEMP /F/    47.5 /53.2/     49.8        -2.3

ANNUAL AVERAGE LOW TEMP /F/     29.8 /34.6/     30.4        -0.6

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         39.76 /36.36/   35.68       +4.08

SNOWFALL /INCHES/              234.8 /156.7/   203.3       +31.5

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/          -20 ON 2/4

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          92 ON 7/16 AND 8/25
---------------------------------------------------------------------
MARQUETTE CITY STATISTICS /RECORD 1875 TO PRESENT/

                                2013 /2012/  1981-2010      2013
                                 OBSERVED      NORMAL    DEPARTURE
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  41.3 /47.3/     43.2        -1.6

ANNUAL AVERAGE HIGH TEMP /F/    48.2 /54.3/     50.3        -2.1

ANNUAL AVERAGE LOW TEMP /F/     35.2 /40.2/     36.2        -1.0

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         34.90 /28.53/   29.13       +5.77

SNOWFALL /INCHES/              108.9 /55.7/    117.2        -8.3

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/           -9 ON 1/23

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          94 ON 8/25
---------------------------------------------------------------------
IRONWOOD STATISTICS /RECORD 1901 TO PRESENT/

...RECORD CALENDAR YEAR PRECIPITATION...
...4TH HIGHEST CALENDAR YEAR SNOWFALL...
...4TH COOLEST YEAR...

                                2013 /2012/  1981-2010      2013
                                 OBSERVED      NORMAL    DEPARTURE
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  37.9 /43.7/     40.1        -2.2

ANNUAL AVERAGE HIGH TEMP /F/    47.5 /53.7/     49.8        -2.3

ANNUAL AVERAGE LOW TEMP /F/     28.2 /33.7/     30.4        -2.2

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         53.46 /33.50/   34.93      +18.53

SNOWFALL /INCHES/              244.8 /124.7/   188.2       +56.6

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/          -22 ON 2/5 AND 12/30

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          92 ON 8/25
---------------------------------------------------------------------
IRON MOUNTAIN STATISTICS /RECORD 1899 TO PRESENT/

...9TH COOLEST YEAR...
...22ND HIGHEST CALENDAR YEAR SNOWFALL...
...23RD WETTEST YEAR...



                                2013 /2012/  1981-2010      2013
                                 OBSERVED      NORMAL    DEPARTURE
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  40.8 /46.1/     42.3        -1.5

ANNUAL AVERAGE HIGH TEMP /F/    51.4 /57.0/     53.6        -2.2

ANNUAL AVERAGE LOW TEMP /F/     30.3 /35.2/     31.0        -0.7

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         32.03 /23.72/   29.72       +2.31

SNOWFALL /INCHES/               65.5 /51.4/     58.4        +7.1

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/          -17 ON 2/17

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          94 ON 7/16...7/17 AND 7/18
---------------------------------------------------------------------
NEWBERRY STATISTICS /RECORD 1899 TO PRESENT/

...RECORD HIGHEST CALENDAR YEAR SNOWFALL...
...5TH WETTEST YEAR...
...25TH COOLEST YEAR MAINLY DUE TO LOW MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES...

                                2013 /2012/  1981-2010      2013
                                 OBSERVED      NORMAL    DEPARTURE
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  41.1 /45.9/     42.0        -0.9

ANNUAL AVERAGE HIGH TEMP /F/    49.2 /54.3/     51.2        -2.0

ANNUAL AVERAGE LOW TEMP /F/     33.0 /37.5/     32.7        +0.3

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         43.49 /MISSING/ 34.23       +9.26

SNOWFALL /INCHES/              222.7 /MISSING/ 132.2       +90.5

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/          -20 ON 12/24

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          91 ON 7/17
---------------------------------------------------------------------
HOUGHTON COUNTY AIRPORT STATISTICS /RECORD 1887 TO PRESENT/

...4TH HIGHEST CALENDAR YEAR SNOWFALL...
...11TH WETTEST YEAR...
...22ND COOLEST YEAR...

                                2013 /2012/  1981-2010      2013
                                 OBSERVED      NORMAL    DEPARTURE
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  39.1 /44.0/     40.5        -1.4

ANNUAL AVERAGE HIGH TEMP /F/    47.2 /52.6/     49.0        -1.8

ANNUAL AVERAGE LOW TEMP /F/     31.0 /35.5/     31.9        -0.9

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         41.10 /28.66/   32.18       +8.92

SNOWFALL /INCHES/              306.9 /136.3/   207.7       +99.2

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/          -14 ON 2/6

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          90 ON 8/25
---------------------------------------------------------------------
ONTONAGON STATISTICS /RECORD 1978 TO PRESENT/

...3RD HIGHEST CALENDAR YEAR SNOWFALL...
...4TH WETTEST YEAR...
...7TH COOLEST YEAR...

                                2013 /2012/  1981-2010      2013
                                 OBSERVED      NORMAL    DEPARTURE
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  41.7 /46.7/     43.1        -1.4

ANNUAL AVERAGE HIGH TEMP /F/    51.6 /57.3/     53.7        -2.1

ANNUAL AVERAGE LOW TEMP /F/     31.7 /36.0/     32.6        -0.9

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         38.68 /30.96/   33.12       +5.56

SNOWFALL /INCHES/              264.4 /127.0/   187.6       +77.8

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/          -18 ON 2/21

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          95 ON 8/25
---------------------------------------------------------------------
MUNISING STATISTICS /RECORD 1911 TO PRESENT/

...RECORD HIGHEST CALENDAR YEAR SNOWFALL...
...6TH WETTEST YEAR...
...8TH COOLEST YEAR...

                                2013 /2012/  1981-2010      2013
                                 OBSERVED      NORMAL    DEPARTURE
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  40.1 /45.1/     42.0        -1.9

ANNUAL AVERAGE HIGH TEMP /F/    47.4 /52.8/     49.9        -2.5

ANNUAL AVERAGE LOW TEMP /F/     32.9 /37.4/     34.0        -1.1

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         43.95 /37.69/   38.45       +5.50

SNOWFALL /INCHES/              228.0 /120.5/   152.1       +75.9

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/           -9 ON 1/23

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          92 ON 7/16
---------------------------------------------------------------------
MANISTIQUE STATISTICS /RECORD 1896 TO PRESENT/

...RECORD CALENDAR YEAR PRECIPITATION...
...5TH HIGHEST CALENDAR YEAR SNOWFALL...
...7TH COOLEST YEAR...

                                2013 /2012/  1981-2010      2013
                                 OBSERVED      NORMAL    DEPARTURE
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  40.3 /45.1/     41.9        -1.6

ANNUAL AVERAGE HIGH TEMP /F/    48.0 /52.8/     49.9        -1.9

ANNUAL AVERAGE LOW TEMP /F/     32.6 /37.4/     33.7        -1.1

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         39.42 /26.90/   27.50      +11.92

SNOWFALL /INCHES/              102.5 /53.7/     74.4       +28.1

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/          -12 ON 1/23

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          93 ON 7/17
---------------------------------------------------------------------
WATTON /BARAGA COUNTY/ STATISTICS

                                2013 /2012/
                                 OBSERVED
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  37.7 /43.1/

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         33.25 /31.75/

SNOWFALL /INCHES/               148.0 /94.1/

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/          -17 ON 1/24

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          88 ON 8/25
---------------------------------------------------------------------
GARDEN CORNERS /DELTA COUNTY/ STATISTICS

                                2013 /2012/
                                 OBSERVED
ANNUAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE /F/  40.4 /44.8/

PRECIPITATION /INCHES/         39.73 /28.89/

SNOWFALL /INCHES/              100.8 /51.2/

LOWEST TEMPERATURE /F/          -17 ON 2/4

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE /F/          89 ON 7/17 AND 7/19
____________________________________________________________________
GREAT LAKES WATER LEVELS (FEET ABOVE MEAN SEA LEVEL)

...GREAT LAKES WATER LEVELS REBOUND IN 2013...

                            LAKE SUPERIOR  LAKE MICHIGAN-HURON
                            OBS/NORM /DIFF    OBS/NORM /DIFF
01/01/13 DAILY MEAN       600.5/601.5/-1.0  576.1/578.4/-2.3
02/01/13 DAILY MEAN       600.3/601.3/-1.0  576.1/578.4/-2.3
03/01/13 DAILY MEAN       600.2/601.1/-0.9  576.2/578.4/-2.2
04/01/13 DAILY MEAN       600.1/601.2/-1.1  576.2/578.7/-2.5
05/01/13 DAILY MEAN       600.4/601.6/-1.2  577.1/579.0/-1.9
06/01/13 DAILY MEAN       601.2/601.8/-0.6  577.5/579.2/-1.7
07/01/13 DAILY MEAN       601.4/602.1/-0.7  577.6/579.3/-1.7
08/01/13 DAILY MEAN       601.9/602.1/-0.2  577.7/579.3/-1.6
09/01/13 DAILY MEAN       602.0/602.1/-0.1  577.7/579.1/-1.4
10/01/13 DAILY MEAN       601.9/602.1/-0.2  577.5/578.9/-1.4
11/01/13 DAILY MEAN       601.8/601.9/-0.1  577.4/578.7/-1.3
12/01/13 DAILY MEAN       601.6/601.7/-0.1  577.4/578.5/-1.1
12/31/13 DAILY MEAN       601.5/601.5/ 0.0  577.3/578.4/-1.1

A COMBINATION OF INCREASED RUNOFF FROM HEAVIER ANNUAL PRECIPITATION
AND MELTING SNOW AS WELL AS REDUCED EVAPORATION RESULTING FROM
LOWER AIR/WATER TEMPERATURES CAUSED THE LEVELS OF LAKES SUPERIOR
AND MICHIGAN/HURON TO RISE 12 TO 18 INCHES FROM 2012 TO 2013. LAKES
MICHIGAN/HURON HAD REACHED RECORD LOW LEVELS AROUND 30 INCHES BELOW
NORMAL IN THE FALL OF 2012...BUT THE MORE FAVORABLE CONDITIONS
ALLOWED THESE BODIES OF WATER TO RECOVER TO WITHIN A FOOT OF THE
LONG-TERM MEAN BY THE END OF 2013. THE LEVEL OF LAKE SUPERIOR
REACHED THE LONG-TERM AVERAGE IN DECEMBER 2013 AFTER STARTING THE
YEAR ABOUT A FOOT BELOW NORMAL.
____________________________________________________________________
...2013 SUMMARY...

THE FIRST HALF OF JANUARY 2013 WAS DOMINATED BY A WEST-TO-EAST FLOW
OF MILD PACIFIC AIR THAT BOOSTED MEAN DAILY TEMPERATURES TO AS MUCH
AS 20 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL ON 1/11 AND 1/12...BUT THEN A MUCH MORE
WINTRY PATTERN THAT FEATURED A RIDGE OVER WESTERN NORTH AMERICA AND
A TROUGH OVER THE EAST HALF OF THE CONTINENT PREVAILED FOR MUCH OF
THE SECOND HALF OF THE MONTH. ALTHOUGH THERE WERE BREAKS IN THIS
WESTERN RIDGE/EASTERN TROUGH UPPER FLOW MAINLY DURING THE LAST WEEK
OF JANUARY...THE SECOND AND FOURTH WEEKS OF FEBRUARY...THE LAST WEEK
OF MARCH...AND AT THE END OF APRIL...THIS BASIC PATTERN REMAINED IN
PLACE THROUGH THE FIRST HALF OF MAY...BRINGING A PERIOD OF OVERALL
BELOW NORMAL TEMPERATURES TO UPPER MICHIGAN BETWEEN THE MIDDLE OF
JANUARY AND THE MIDDLE OF MAY. SINCE A NUMBER OF DEEP LOW PRESSURE
SYSTEMS TRACKED THROUGH THE MEAN UPPER TROUGH AND THE GREAT LAKES
DURING THIS TIME...THE MID-JANUARY THROUGH MID-MAY TIME ALSO
FEATURED ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION AND SNOWFALL. IN FACT...THE
FEBRUARY THROUGH APRIL 2013 PERIOD ENDED UP AS ONE OF THE TOP TEN
WETTEST AND SNOWIEST FEBRUARY THROUGH APRIL 3-MONTH PERIODS ON
RECORD AT MANY PLACES ACROSS THE U.P. ALMOST 110 INCHES OF SNOW
BURIED MUNISING DURING THIS TIME...THE HEAVIEST FEBRUARY THROUGH
APRIL SNOWFALL ON RECORD FOR THAT SITE.

THE MEAN MONTHLY TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 2 TO 3 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL
IN JANUARY BECAUSE THE WARMTH THE FIRST HALF OF THE MONTH AND DURING
A PORTION OF THE LAST WEEK WAS SO ANOMALOUS. MEAN DAILY TEMPERATURES
RAN AS MUCH AS 20 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL ON 1/11...1/12 AND AGAIN ON
1/28 AND 1/29. AFTER THE TROUGH DEEPENED AROUND MID-MONTH...AN
INTENSELY COLD CANADIAN AIRMASS INVADED THE GREAT LAKES ON 1/20 TO
1/25 AND DROPPED MEAN DAILY TEMPERATURES TO AS MUCH AS 20 TO 25
DEGREES BELOW AVERAGE ON 1/21 AND 1/22. THE MERCURY NEVER ROSE ABOVE
ZERO AT MANY PLACES OVER THE INTERIOR WEST HALF FROM LATE ON 1/20
UNTIL THE AFTERNOON ON 1/23. ALTHOUGH THE FIRST HALF OF JANUARY WAS
DRY DUE TO AN ABSENCE OF DEEP LOW PRESSURE SYSTEMS AND ARCTIC AIR
THAT LIMITED LAKE EFFECT SNOW...HEAVIER PRECIPITATION FELL DURING
THE LAST HALF. ALMOST CONTINUOUS LAKE EFFECT SNOWS FELL IN THE WEST
TO NORTHWEST WIND SNOW BELTS DURING THIS TIME AND ACCUMULATED AS
MUCH AS 75 TO 80 INCHES AT A FEW LOCATIONS.

AS THE UPPER TROUGH DEEPENED INTO CENTRAL NORTH AMERICA AT THE END
OF JANUARY...A DEEP MOISTURE-LADEN LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM MOVED THROUGH
THE GREAT LAKES ON 1/30...BRINGING HEAVY SNOW UP TO 18 INCHES TO
MAINLY THE EAST HALF OF THE U.P. AS WELL AS CONSIDERABLE BLOWING AND
DRIFTING SNOW. TOTAL JANUARY LIQUID EQUIVALENT PRECIPITATION RANGED
FROM AS LITTLE AS 1.25 TO 1.50 INCHES OVER THE SOUTH CENTRAL TO AS
MUCH AS 3.50 TO 4.50 INCHES OVER THE KEWEENAW. JANUARY SNOW WAS
ABOUT 12 INCHES NEAR THE WISCONSIN BORDER TO 83 INCHES AT ATLANTIC
MINE IN HOUGHTON COUNTY. OVERALL JANUARY PRECIPITATION AND SNOWFALL
ENDED UP FROM NOT FAR FROM NORMAL TO 150 PERCENT OF THE MEAN.

SEVERAL DEEP LOW PRESSURE SYSTEMS IMPACTED UPPER MICHIGAN IN
FEBRUARY 2013...AND THERE WERE PERIODS OF HEAVY LAKE EFFECT SNOW
DURING MAINLY THE FIRST AND THIRD WEEKS WHEN COLD CANADIAN AIRMASSES
WERE PRESENT. MONTHLY PRECIPITATION AND SNOWFALL WERE WELL ABOVE
NORMAL...ESPECIALLY OVER THE EAST AND IN THE KEWEENAW...WHERE SOME
PLACES EXPERIENCED A TOP FIVE WETTEST AND SNOWIEST FEBRUARY. MONTHLY
PRECIPITATION AND SNOWFALL REACHED OVER 4 INCHES AND 50 TO 65 INCHES
RESPECTIVELY IN THESE AREAS...VALUES AS HIGH AS 200 TO 300 PERCENT
OF NORMAL. AS IS OFTEN THE CASE IN DEEP WINTER...THE LEAST
PRECIPITATION AND SNOW FELL OVER THE INTERIOR WEST HALF...WHERE
FEBRUARY TOTALS ENDED UP 1.00 TO 1.50 INCHES AND 14 TO 18 INCHES...
ABOUT 150 TO 175 PERCENT OF THE AVERAGE.

THE MOST NOTABLE STORM SYSTEM IN FEBRUARY OCCURRED FROM LATE ON 2/18
THROUGH 2/20. AT LEAST A FOOT OF SNOW FELL OVER MOST OF THE NORTHERN
UPPER PENINSULA. AS MUCH AS 18 TO 30 INCHES OF THE WHITE STUFF
BURIED PORTIONS OF MARQUETTE AND ALGER COUNTIES DURING THIS
EVENT...AND GUSTY WINDS AS HIGH AS 50 MPH TO THE NORTH OF LOW
PRESSURE TRACKING THROUGH THE CENTRAL GREAT LAKES CAUSED ENOUGH
BLOWING SNOW TO BUILD DRIFTS AS HIGH AS 6 TO 8 FEET AND CREATE
BLIZZARD CONDITIONS. CONDITIONS WERE SO BAD BETWEEN MARQUETTE AND
MUNISING...THE STATE POLICE CLOSED THAT SECTION OF M-28 FROM LATE ON
2/19 INTO EARLY 2/21. THE MEAN FEBRUARY TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM
ABOUT 3 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL NEAR THE WISCONSIN BORDER TO ABOUT 0.5
DEGREE BELOW AVERAGE OVER THE NORTH CENTRAL AND EAST. THE COLDEST
WEATHER OF THE MONTH WAS DURING THE FIRST WEEK...WHEN THE
THERMOMETER FAILED TO RISE ABOVE ZERO AT A FEW PLACES ON 2/1 AND
MEAN DAILY TEMPERATURES FELL NEAR 20 DEGREES BELOW AVERAGE ON 2/4.

UNDER THE DOMINATING UPPER TROUGH...ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION AND
SNOWFALL WERE THE RULE OVER MUCH OF UPPER MICHIGAN IN MARCH 2013.
THE HEAVIEST WATER EQUIVALENT PRECIPITATION AND SNOW FELL OVER THE
WEST AND NORTH CENTRAL...WHERE THE MARCH TOTALS EXCEEDED 3.00
INCHES...AS MUCH AS 150 PERCENT OF NORMAL...AND 50 INCHES...OR 150
TO 250 PERCENT OF THE AVERAGE...AT SOME OF THE HIGHER TERRAIN SPOTS.
IN FACT...MARCH 2013 RANKS AS ONE OF THE TOP 10 SNOWIEST THIRD
MONTHS AT MANY SPOTS FROM MARQUETTE COUNTY TO MUNISING AND NEWBERRY.
LOCATIONS OVER SOUTHEAST UPPER MICHIGAN SAW THE LEAST PRECIPITATION
AND SNOW...BUT EVEN THERE MONTHLY TOTALS WERE CLOSE TO NORMAL.

THE MOST ACTIVE PERIOD WAS AROUND MID-MONTH...WHEN A PAIR OF DEEP
LOW PRESSURE SYSTEMS DROPPED SOME HEAVY SNOW ON UPPER MICHIGAN. THE
FIRST OF THESE TRACKED THROUGH EASTERN UPPER MICHIGAN ON 3/11 AND
DUMPED 12 TO 19 INCHES OF SNOW ON PORTIONS OF THE WEST AND NORTH
CENTRAL. THE SECOND LOW MOVED THROUGH MINNESOTA ON 3/18 INTO 3/19
AND DROPPED SOME MODERATE SNOW OVER THE U.P. AFTER THE LOW MOVED
INTO ONTARIO ON 3/19...SOME HEAVY LAKE EFFECT SNOWS DEVELOPED IN THE
NORTHWEST WIND SNOW BELTS...LIFTING STORM TOTAL SNOWFALL AT SOME
HIGHER TERRAIN LOCATIONS TO 20 INCHES OR MORE. ROCKLAND IN ONTONAGON
COUNTY WAS BURIED UNDER AS MUCH AS 32 INCHES...AND THE SNOW DEPTH AT
THAT LOCATION ROSE TO 53 INCHES ON 3/20. WINDS GUSTING AS HIGH AS 40
MPH ALSO CAUSED CONSIDERABLE BLOWING AND DRIFTING SNOW. ALTHOUGH
THERE WAS SOME MODERATION IN THE PERSISTENT COLD DURING THE LAST
WEEK OF MARCH...THE MONTHLY MEAN TEMPERATURE STILL ENDED UP FROM AS
MUCH AS 5 DEGREES BELOW AVERAGE OVER THE NORTHWEST TO 1 TO 2 DEGREES
BELOW NORMAL ACROSS THE EAST.

THE STUBBORN UPPER TROUGH LINGERED OVER EASTERN AND CENTRAL NORTH
AMERICA UNTIL THE LAST WEEK OF APRIL...SO THE WEATHER PATTERN THAT
PREVAILED ACROSS UPPER MICHIGAN WAS A WINTRY ONE. ALMOST EVERY DAY
THROUGH 4/25 WAS COLDER THAN NORMAL...AND THERE WERE SOME SUB-ZERO
LOW TEMPERATURES OVER THE INTERIOR DURING A COLD PERIOD IN THE FIRST
WEEK. MEAN MONTHLY TEMPERATURES RANGED FROM 4 TO AS MUCH AS 8
DEGREES BELOW AVERAGE...ENOUGH TO QUALIFY THE MONTH AS ONE OF THE
TOP FIVE COLDEST ON RECORD AT MOST LOCATIONS. SINCE THE DEEP UPPER
TROUGH DOMINATED THE FLOW THROUGH THE GREAT LAKES...APRIL ALSO
FEATURED AN ACTIVE WEATHER PATTERN WITH SEVERAL LATE WINTER STORMS
LIFTING MONTHLY PRECIPITATION AND SNOWFALL ABOVE THE MONTHLY AVERAGE
AT MOST LOCATIONS. MOST PLACES MEASURED 3 TO 6 INCHES OF WATER
EQUIVALENT PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH...ABOUT 250 TO 275 PERCENT
OF THE TYPICAL APRIL TOTALS. OVER THE WEST FROM IRONWOOD TO
ONTONAGON AND HOUGHTON...PRECIPITATION TOTALS EXCEEDED 6 INCHES...A
TOP FIVE HIGHEST APRIL AMOUNT AT THOSE SITES. MONTHLY SNOWFALL OVER
THE HIGHER TERRAIN OF THE WEST TOPPED 40 AND EVEN 50 INCHES...A
RECORD APRIL SNOWFALL AT NUMEROUS PLACES AND UP TO 400 PERCENT OF
NORMAL. AREAS NEAR LAKE MICHIGAN SAW A NEAR NORMAL 2 TO 3 INCHES OF
LIQUID EQUIVALENT PRECIPITATION. EVEN THOUGH SNOWFALL OVER THE SOUTH
CENTRAL AND EAST WAS NOT AS EXCESSIVE AS ACROSS THE WEST AND
GENERALLY 10 TO 20 INCHES...THESE MONTHLY TOTALS ARE STILL AMONG THE
TOP TEN HIGHEST ON RECORD FOR APRIL.

THE FIRST OF THE SIGNIFICANT WINTER STORMS TO IMPACT THE U.P.
DROPPED AS MUCH AS 13.5 INCHES OF SNOW AT IRONWOOD ON 4/11 INTO
4/13. ANOTHER LOW FOLLOWING QUICKLY BEHIND THE FIRST ONE MOVED
THROUGH MINNESOTA ON 4/14 INTO 4/15. SINCE THIS LOW TRACKED TO THE
WEST OF THE AREA... THE PRECIPITATION THAT FELL WAS A WINTRY MIX AND
HEAVIEST OVER THE FAR WEST CLOSER TO THE STORM TRACK. WATERSMEET IN
GOGEBIC COUNTY MEASURED UP TO 1.30 INCHES OF LIQUID EQUIVALENT
PRECIPITATION. BUT SINCE THE SNOW CHANGED TO SLEET...FREEZING RAIN
AND RAIN...THE GREATEST SNOW TOTALS WERE NO MORE THAN 5 INCHES EVEN
AT SOME HIGHER TERRAIN LOCATIONS OVER THE WEST. THE NEXT STORM
SYSTEM OF SIGNIFICANCE STRUCK THE UPPER GREAT LAKES ON 4/18 INTO
4/20. ONCE AGAIN...THE HEAVIEST PRECIPITATION AND SNOW FELL OVER THE
WEST...WHERE TOTALS REACHED 2 INCHES OR MORE AND OVER 12 INCHES
RESPECTIVELY AT SOME PLACES. TWIN LAKES IN HOUGHTON COUNTY LED
REPORTING STATIONS WITH 21.4 INCHES OF SNOW...AND NORTH WINDS
GUSTING AS HIGH AS 55 MPH OVER THE KEWEENAW CAUSED BLIZZARD
CONDITIONS IN THAT AREA. THE LAST BIG STORM OF THE MONTH CROSSED
CENTRAL UPPER MICHIGAN ON 4/22 INTO 4/23. SINCE THE WEST WAS ON THE
COLD SIDE OF THE LOW TRACK...THIS AREA ONCE AGAIN SAW THE HEAVIEST
PRECIPITATION AND SNOWFALL. ALMOST 10 INCHES OF THE WHITE STUFF
FELL AT IRONWOOD. AFTER ALL THIS APRIL SNOWFALL...SNOW DEPTHS WERE
AT RECORD LEVELS INTO THE LAST WEEK OF THE MONTH...INCLUDING AN
IMPRESSIVE 40 INCHES AT ATLANTIC MINE ON 4/25. WITH THE WELCOME...
BUT RAPID  ARRIVAL OF MUCH WARMER AIR THE LAST WEEK OF APRIL...THE
RUNOFF FROM THE MELTING OF THIS UNSEASONABLY HIGH LATE SEASON SNOW
CONTRIBUTED TO SIGNIFICANT WATER LEVELS RISES ON AREA RIVERS AND
STREAMS...ESPECIALLY OVER THE WEST AND NORTH CENTRAL. SOME RIVERS
TOPPED FLOOD STAGE BY 4/30...AND THE GENERALLY MINOR FLOODING
PERSISTED THROUGH EARLY MAY.

THE PERSISTENT DEEP TROUGH OVER EASTERN AND CENTRAL NORTH AMERICA
PERSISTED THROUGH THE MIDDLE OF MAY 2013...RESULTING IN COOL AND WET
WEATHER ESPECIALLY OVER THE WEST HALF OF THE U.P. BUT SINCE THIS
UPPER PATTERN BEGAN TO RELAX THE SECOND HALF OF THE MONTH...SOME
WARMER AIRMASSES RETURNED AT TIMES. SO MAY WAS NOT AS CHILLY
RELATIVE TO NORMAL AS APRIL OR THE PRECEDING MONTHS. THE MONTHLY
MEAN TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM ABOUT NORMAL OVER THE EAST TO AS MUCH
AS 2 TO 4 DEGREES BELOW AVERAGE OVER THE WEST HALF. AS HAD BEEN THE
CASE IN RECENT MONTHS...THE HEAVIEST PRECIPITATION FELL OVER THE
WEST IN MAY. IRONWOOD REPORTED A NEAR RECORD 7.14 INCHES IN MAY...
230 PERCENT OF THE MONTHLY NORMAL. MOST PLACES OVER THE NORTHWEST
HALF MEASURED 3.00 TO 6.00 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION...BUT ONLY 1.75
TO 3.00 INCHES FELL ACROSS THE SOUTHEAST. AREAS OVER THE FAR SOUTH
CENTRAL BETWEEN MENOMINEE AND ESCANABA REPORTED THE LOWEST TOTALS...
ONLY 60 PERCENT OF NORMAL.

A LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM MOVING NORTHEAST ON A STALLED COLD FRONT JUST
TO THE EAST OF NEWBERRY DROPPED A WINTRY MIX OF SNOW...SLEET...
FREEZING RAIN AND RAIN ON THE WEST HALF FROM LATE ON 5/1 INTO 5/3.
IRONWOOD REPORTED THE MOST PRECIPITATION AND SNOWFALL WITH 2.92
INCHES AND 15.1 INCHES RESPECTIVELY DURING THIS LATE WINTER STORM.
THERE WAS ANOTHER ACCUMULATING SNOW UP TO 4 INCHES FROM LATE ON
5/11 INTO 5/12 THAT BROUGHT A WHITE MOTHER`S DAY MORNING TO ALL BUT
THE SOUTH CENTRAL. MANY PLACES SAW A TOP 10 SNOWIEST MAY THANKS TO
THESE TWO SNOW STORMS. SOME HEAVY RAINS FELL OVER MAINLY WESTERN
UPPER MICHIGAN DURING THE WEEK FROM 5/17 THROUGH 5/23 AS A DEEP...
MOIST SOUTHERLY FLOW DEVELOPED TO THE EAST OF AN INTENSIFYING
TROUGH IN THE PLAINS. WEEKLY RAINFALL OF 2 INCHES OR MORE WAS COMMON
OVER THE WEST...WITH AS MUCH AS 3.90 INCHES FALLING AT BERGLAND DAM
IN ONTONAGON COUNTY. AT THE END OF THE MONTH...ANOTHER TROUGH
DEEPENED OVER THE NORTHERN PLAINS. THE STRONG SOUTH WIND TO THE EAST
OF THE ACCOMPANYING LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM ADVECTED A WARM...SUMMER-
LIKE AIRMASS INTO THE UPPER GREAT LAKES. WITH TEMPERATURES PEAKING
WELL IN THE 80S AWAY FROM THE COOLING INFLUENCE OF THE LAKES AND
DISTURBANCES ROTATING THROUGH THE PLAINS TROUGH INFLUENCING THE
AREA...SOME SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS DEVELOPED DURING THE EVENINGS ON
5/30 AND 5/31 OVER THE WEST HALF. DAMAGING WINDS AND/OR LARGE HAIL
WERE REPORTED AT SOME PLACES IN IRON...DICKINSON...MARQUETTE...
BARAGA AND MARQUETTE COUNTIES.

EXCEPT FOR JUNE WHEN A NORTHWEST FLOW ALOFT ON THE WESTERN FLANK OF
A MEAN TROUGH IN EASTERN NORTH AMERICA FUNNELED SOME COOLER CANADIAN
AIRMASSES INTO THE UPPER GREAT LAKES...A CHANGEABLE WEATHER PATTERN
WAS THE RULE ACROSS THE AREA IN THE SUMMER OF 2013. NUMEROUS
DISTURBANCES MOVING THROUGH THE UPPER TROUGH IN JUNE AND THEN IN THE
MORE OSCILLATING FLOW OF JULY AND AUGUST CAUSED THE SUMMER
PRECIPITATION TO RUN WELL ABOVE AVERAGE. AT IRONWOOD...20.74 INCHES
OF RAIN FELL IN JUNE THROUGH AUGUST...ALMOST DOUBLE THE NORMAL
PRECIPITATION FOR THIS 3-MONTH PERIOD. SUMMER 2013 IS NOW THE SECOND
WETTEST JUNE THROUGH AUGUST ON RECORD AT IRONWOOD. SINCE SPRING ALSO
FEATURED WELL ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION THERE...MARCH THROUGH
AUGUST 2013 IS THE RECORD WETTEST SUCH PERIOD SINCE WEATHER
OBSERVATIONS BEGAN AT IRONWOOD IN 1901. A TOTAL OF 36.41 INCHES FELL
DURING THOSE SIX MONTHS...ABOUT 1.50 INCHES MORE THAN FALLS IN A
NORMAL CALENDAR YEAR AT IRONWOOD. SINCE JUNE TENDED TO BE ON THE
COOL SIDE AT MOST LOCATIONS AND THE VARIABLE EXTREMES IN JULY AND
AUGUST TENDED TO BALANCE OUT...THE OVERALL MEAN SUMMER TEMPERATURE
ENDED UP FROM NEAR AVERAGE TO AROUND A DEGREE BELOW NORMAL AT THE
COOLER SPOTS.

JUNE 2013 ENDED UP WETTER AND COOLER THAN NORMAL AT MOST PLACES DUE
TO THE PRESENCE OF A MEAN TROUGH OVER EASTERN NORTH AMERICA THAT
ALLOWED THE FREQUENT INTRUSION OF CANADIAN AIRMASSES INTO THE GREAT
LAKES. THE MEAN MONTHLY TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM NEAR NORMAL TO ABOUT
2 DEGREES BELOW AVERAGE AT THE COOLER LOCATIONS. THE ONLY REAL
PERIOD THAT FEATURED SUMMER-LIKE WARMTH WAS 6/23 INTO 6/27...WHEN AN
UPPER RIDGE BUILT INTO THE GREAT LAKES AND TEMPORARILY DISLODGED THE
PERSISTENT TROUGH. THE ONLY 90-DEGREE TEMPERATURES REPORTED IN JUNE
OCCURRED ON 6/25. AS HAD BEEN THE CASE IN RECENT MONTHS...THE
HEAVIEST PRECIPITATION IN JUNE FELL OVER WESTERN UPPER MICHIGAN.
MANY LOCATIONS FROM IRONWOOD THROUGH THE KEWEENAW LOGGED 5 TO 6
INCHES OR MORE OF RAIN...AS MUCH AS 175 PERCENT OF THE MONTHLY NORM.
THE HEAVIEST RAINS FELL DURING THE FIRST AND FOURTH WEEKS OF THE
MONTH. DURING THE PERIOD FROM 6/20 THROUGH 6/22 WHEN A STATIONARY
FRONT WAS DRAPED ACROSS UPPER MICHIGAN...2 INCHES OF RAIN OR MORE
INUNDATED SOME WESTERN LOCATIONS...WITH UP TO 2.57 INCHES AT BARAGA.
A SERIES OF STRONG DISTURBANCES CROSSING THE GREAT LAKES CAUSED MORE
HEAVY SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ON 6/26 INTO 6/28. AS MUCH AS 2.59
INCHES OF RAIN DELUGED IRON MOUNTAIN DURING THIS TIME. THE ONLY
SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS TO IMPACT UPPER MICHIGAN OCCURRED ON 6/26 AND
6/27...WHEN A FEW LOCATIONS SAW DAMAGING WIND GUSTS AND LARGE HAIL.

THE WEATHER IN JULY 2013 FEATURED STRETCHES OF BOTH VERY WARM AND
VERY COOL WEATHER AS THE UPPER AIR FLOW TRANSITIONED BETWEEN PERIODS
DOMINATED BY AN UPPER TROUGH AND A RIDGE OVER THE GREAT LAKES. THE
COOLEST PERIODS WERE THE FIRST COUPLE OF DAYS AND THE LAST 10 DAYS
OF JULY WHEN THE TROUGH DOMINATED. UNDER A GRAY OVERCAST WITH
NUMEROUS SHOWERS AROUND...MANY NEW DAILY RECORD LOW MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURES IN THE 50S WERE ESTABLISHED ON 7/27 AND 7/28. IRON
MOUNTAIN REPORTED THE LOWEST HIGH TEMPERATURE EVER IN JULY ON
7/28...WHEN THE MERCURY THERE TOPPED OUT AT ONLY 55. THE WARMEST
PERIOD WAS FROM 7/13 THROUGH 7/19...WHEN AN ANOMALOUSLY STRONG UPPER
RIDGE BUILT OVER THE GREAT LAKES. THE THERMOMETER REACHED 90 OR
HIGHER AT MANY PLACES DURING THE AFTERNOONS OF THESE DAYS...AND
READINGS DID NOT FALL BELOW 70 SOME LOCATIONS ON SOME OF THE NIGHTS.
SINCE THESE TEMPERATURES EXTREMES TENDED TO BALANCE OUT...THE MEAN
JULY TEMPERATURE ENDED UP WITHIN A DEGREE OF NORMAL ACROSS THE U.P.

JULY WAS A WET MONTH OVERALL...THE SIXTH IN A ROW OF ABUNDANT
PRECIPITATION AT MOST SITES. FREQUENT SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS FELL
WHEN THE TROUGH WAS DEEPER OR WHEN THE UPPER PATTERN WAS
TRANSITIONING AND DUMPED 6 INCHES OR MORE OF RAIN AT MANY PLACES IN
A SWATH OVER THE WEST FROM IRONWOOD THROUGH THE KEWEENAW AND EAST OF
LINE FROM ESCANABA TO MUNISING...WITH 8 INCHES OR MORE AT A NUMBER
OF SPOTS...INCLUDING 8.89 INCHES AT WATERSMEET IN GOGEBIC COUNTY.
THESE TOTALS ARE 150 TO 250 PERCENT OF THE JULY AVERAGE AND QUALIFY
JULY 2013 AS ONE OF THE TOP FIVE WETTEST SEVENTH MONTHS ON RECORD AT
SOME LOCATIONS. THE 8.46 INCHES OF RAIN THAT FELL AT NEWBERRY WAS
THE HIGHEST PRECIPITATION EVER MEASURED THERE IN JULY AND 275
PERCENT OF THE MONTHLY NORMAL. IRON MOUNTAIN WAS ONE OF THE FEW
SPOTS THAT TENDED TO MISS MUCH OF THE CONVECTION AND END UP WITH A
BELOW NORMAL MONTHLY RAINFALL.

THE WETTEST PERIODS IN JULY WERE LATE ON 7/6 INTO 7/8...7/17 INTO
7/19...AND LATE ON 7/25 THROUGH 7/28. A NEARLY STATIONARY FRONT WAS
THE FOCUS FOR SOME HEAVY SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS DURING THE 7/6
INTO 7/8 PERIOD. AS A PAIR OF UPPER DISTURBANCES INTERACTED WITH
THIS FRONT AND A HUMID AIRMASS IN PLACE...2 INCHES OF RAIN FELL
ACROSS PORTIONS OF MAINLY WESTERN UPPER MICHIGAN. MARENISCO IN
GOGEBIC COUNTY WAS DELUGED WITH 4.12 INCHES OF RAIN DURING THIS
TIME. WAVES OF SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ACCOMPANIED BY SOME
TORRENTIAL DOWNPOURS AND SEVERE WEATHER OCCURRED ON 7/17 INTO 7/19
AS AN UPPER TROUGH DEEPENED BACK INTO THE UPPER LAKES AND LIFTED THE
VERY WARM AND UNSTABLE AIRMASS THAT HAD ARRIVED IN THE DAYS BEFORE
UNDER THE BUILDING UPPER RIDGE. MANY PLACES AWAY FROM THE SOUTH
CENTRAL MEASURED 1 TO 2 INCHES OF RAIN DURING THIS TIME...WITH AS
MUCH AS 4.09 INCHES FALLING AT NEWBERRY. A FEW LOCATIONS IN LUCE...
MARQUETTE...BARAGA...HOUGHTON AND DELTA COUNTIES WERE STRUCK BY SOME
OF THE SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS ON 7/17 THROUGH 7/19. WIDESPREAD SHOWERS
DROPPED AT LEAST 1 TO 2 INCHES OF RAIN ACROSS THE U.P. FROM LATE IN
THE DAY ON 7/25 THROUGH 7/28. RAINFALL TOTALS WERE PARTICULARLY
EXCESSIVE FROM NEAR MANISTIQUE TO NEWBERRY. GARDEN CORNERS IN FAR
SOUTHEAST DELTA COUNTY PICKED UP 5.08 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE COOL NORTHWEST FLOW ALOFT ON THE WESTERN FLANK OF A DEEP TROUGH
IN EASTERN CANADA THAT PREVAILED AT THE END OF JULY REMAINED IN
PLACE DURING THE FIRST HALF OF AUGUST 2013 AND FUNNELED CANADIAN
AIRMASSES INTO THE UPPER GREAT LAKES. MEAN DAILY TEMPERATURES RAN
BELOW NORMAL ALMOST EVERY DAY FROM 8/1 THROUGH 8/16...A PERIOD WHEN
THE MEAN DAILY TEMPERATURES AVERAGED 5 TO 8 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL. ON
THE COOLEST DAYS...THE MERCURY DIPPED INTO THE 30S AT MANY OF THE
COOLER INTERIOR LOCATIONS OF UPPER MICHIGAN. THE WEATHER PATTERN
CHANGED ABRUPTLY THE SECOND HALF OF AUGUST TO ONE THAT FEATURED AN
EXPANDING UPPER RIDGE INTO THE NORTH CENTRAL UNITED STATES...
INCLUDING THE UPPER GREAT LAKES. MOST OF THE DAYS FROM 8/17 THROUGH
8/31 WERE WARMER TO MUCH WARMER THAN NORMAL...AND THE AVERAGE
TEMPERATURES DURING THESE TWO WEEKS RAN 6 TO 9 DEGREES ABOVE THE
MEAN. THE THERMOMETER PEAKED AS HIGH AS AN UNCOMFORTABLE 95 AT
BARAGA AND ONTONAGON ON 8/25...THE WARMEST DAY OF THE MONTH. THE
RESULT OF THE COOL FIRST HALF AND THE WARM SECOND HALF WAS A MEAN
MONTHLY TEMPERATURE WITHIN A DEGREE OF THE AUGUST NORMAL AT MOST
LOCATIONS.

AS IS OFTEN THE CASE IN SUMMER WHEN HIT-OR-MISS CONVECTION IS THE
DOMINANT PRECIPITATION MODE...RAINFALL OVER UPPER MICHIGAN IN AUGUST
2013 VARIED CONSIDERABLY...EVEN ACROSS SHORT DISTANCES. IN
GENERAL...LOCATIONS NEAR THE WISCONSIN BORDER AND EAST OF A LINE
FROM MARQUETTE TO ESCANABA EXPERIENCED ABOVE NORMAL MONTHLY
RAINFALL. OVER THE NORTHWEST AND ESPECIALLY THE KEWEENAW...AUGUST
PRECIPITATION WAS GENERALLY BELOW AVERAGE. IRONWOOD SAW ANOTHER
MONTH OF WELL ABOVE NORMAL RAINFALL WITH A TOTAL OF 8.40 INCHES.
THIS RAINFALL...WHICH IS ABOUT 250 PERCENT OF THE MONTHLY NORMAL...
LIFTED AUGUST 2013 INTO SECOND PLACE AMONG THE WETTEST EIGHTH
MONTHS AT THAT SITE. MUCH OF THIS RAIN FELL DURING THREE TORRENTIAL
RAIN EVENTS DURING THE LAST WEEK OF AUGUST. NOT TOO FAR TO THE
NORTHEAST...ONTONAGON MISSED MUCH OF THE RAIN THAT FELL AT
IRONWOOD...REPORTING ONLY 1.99 INCHES THE ENTIRE MONTH. COPPER
HARBOR MEASURED ONLY 1.06 INCHES IN AUGUST...ABOUT 35 PERCENT OF
NORMAL.

STRONG TO SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS WERE FAIRLY COMMON IN AUGUST...
ESPECIALLY WHEN WARMER AND MORE HUMID AIR DOMINATED AT THE END OF
THE MONTH. A CLUSTER OF THUNDERSTORMS ON 8/21 IMPACTED ALL BUT THE
NORTHWEST...CAUSING LARGE HAIL OR DAMAGING WINDS IN ONTONAGON...
IRON...ALGER AND MARQUETTE COUNTIES. GARDEN CORNERS IN DELTA COUNTY
PICKED UP 1.33 INCHES OF RAIN DURING THIS EVENT. AS A PAIR OF
DISTURBANCES TOPPED THE SPRAWLING UPPER RIDGE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE
LATE MONTH HEAT...CLUSTERS OF SHOWERS AND ALONG WITH SOME STRONG TO
SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS TRACKED ACROSS UPPER MICHIGAN DURING THE NIGHTS
ON 8/25-8/26 AND 8/26-8/27. DURING THE FIRST OUTBREAK...IRONWOOD
PICKED UP 2.42 INCHES OF RAIN. THERE WAS ALSO WIND DAMAGE IN
MARQUETTE AND LUCE COUNTIES. THE SECOND DISTURBANCE ON 8/26-8/27 WAS
PRIMARILY A HEAVY RAIN MAKER THAT STRUCK AREAS NEAR THE WISCONSIN
BORDER. IRONWOOD LED REPORTING STATIONS AGAIN WITH 2.10 INCHES OF
RAIN. MORE HEAVY RAIN FELL FROM THE AFTERNOON ON 8/29 THROUGH THE
MORNING ON 8/30 IN ADVANCE OF A COLD FRONT TRACKING THROUGH THE
UPPER LAKES. ONCE AGAIN...IRONWOOD SAW THE HEAVIEST PRECIPITATION
WITH 2.01 INCHES.

A VERY CHANGEABLE PATTERN DOMINATED THE GREAT LAKES IN SEPTEMBER
2013...WITH ALTERNATING PERIODS OF WARMER AND COOLER WEATHER
ACCOMPANYING THE PASSAGE OF THE TRANSIENT UPPER RIDGES AND TROUGHS.
DESPITE THIS PROGRESSIVE PATTERN THAT OFTEN RESULTS IN ACTIVE
WEATHER...MOST OF UPPER MICHIGAN SAW BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION IN
SEPTEMBER. OBSERVED TOTALS RAN FROM 1 TO 3 INCHES AT MOST
LOCATIONS...GENERALLY 25 TO 75 PERCENT OF THE SEPTEMBER NORMS. ONLY
0.39 INCH FELL NEAR ONTONAGON...A MERE 12 PERCENT OF THE MONTHLY
AVERAGE RAINFALL.

ALTHOUGH SOME OF THE DAILY MEAN TEMPERATURES ANOMALIES ACCOMPANYING
THE TRANSIENT RIDGES AND TROUGHS WERE 10 DEGREES OR MORE FROM
NORMAL...THESE EXTREMES TENDED TO BALANCE OUT OVER THE ENTIRE MONTH.
WHERE WARMER PREVAILED MORE OFTEN OVER THE WEST...THE MEAN SEPTEMBER
TEMPERATURE ENDED UP 1 TO 2 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. COOLER CONDITIONS
DOMINATED FURTHER EAST...WHERE THE MEAN MONTHLY TEMPERATURE RAN
AROUND A DEGREES BELOW AVERAGE.

DESPITE THE OVERALL DRYNESS IN SEPTEMBER...THERE WERE SOME INSTANCES
OF HEAVY RAIN. A POTENT DISTURBANCE CROSSING LAKE SUPERIOR LIFTED A
VERY WARM AND HUMID AIRMASS IN PLACE ON 9/1...DROPPING SOME HEAVY
RAIN OVER THE KEWEENAW AND NEAR LAKE MICHIGAN. UP TO 2 INCHES FELL
AT COOKS IN SCHOOLCRAFT COUNTY AND AT CALUMET...WHERE SOME STREET
FLOODING ACCOMPANIED THE TORRENTIAL DOWNPOURS. A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM
MOVING EAST ALONG A WARM FRONT OVER LAKE SUPERIOR DUMPED 1.87 INCHES
OF RAIN AND SOME QUARTER-SIZED HAIL ON MOHAWK IN KEWEENAW COUNTY ON
9/9. ON 9/19 AND 9/20...SOME HEAVY RAIN FELL OVER SOUTHEAST UPPER
MICHIGAN AS A SLOW MOVING WARM FRONT PASSED THE AREA. TWO DAY
RAINFALL REACHED AS MUCH AS 2.08 INCHES AT GARDEN CORNERS IN DELTA
COUNTY.

TWO DISTINCT UPPER AIR PATTENS DOMINATED THE WEATHER OVER THE GREAT
LAKES IN OCTOBER 2013. DURING THE FIRST HALF OF THE MONTH...THE
PATTERN FEATURED FEATURED A TROUGH OVER WESTERN NORTH AMERICA AND A
RIDGE OVER THE EAST. THE SOUTHWEST FLOW BETWEEN THESE FEATURES
RESULTED IN UNSEASONABLY WARM WEATHER THE FIRST TWO WEEKS OF
OCTOBER...WITH MEAN DAILY TEMPERATURES AVERAGING AS MUCH AS 20
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL WHEN THE WARMEST WEATHER PREVAILED ON 10/1 INTO
10/2...WHEN THE THERMOMETER ROSE AS HIGH AS 80...AND AGAIN ON 10/9
AND 10/10. DURING THE SECOND HALF OF OCTOBER...THE PATTERN REVERSED
TO A WESTERN RIDGE AND AN EASTERN TROUGH. MEAN DAILY TEMPERATURES
WERE BELOW NORMAL MOST OF THE DAYS FROM 10/15 THROUGH 10/30...AND
LOW TEMPERATURES FELL INTO THE TEENS AT SOME OF THE COOLER INTERIOR
LOCATIONS ON 10/25 AND 10/29...INCLUDING 13 AT KENTON IN FAR
SOUTHERN HOUGHTON COUNTY AND CLARKSBURG-CHAMPION IN MARQUETTE COUNTY
ON 10/29. SINCE THE WARMTH THE FIRST HALF OF OCTOBER WAS MORE
ANOMALOUS...THE OVERALL OCTOBER MEAN TEMPERATURE ENDED UP 0.5 TO 1.5
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL.

EXCEPT FOR THE NORTHERN KEWEENAW AND MUCH OF THE SOUTH CENTRAL...
MOST OF UPPER MICHIGAN SAW ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION IN OCTOBER.
MONTHLY TOTALS WERE AS HIGH AS 5 INCHES OR MORE OVER THE FAR WEST...
WHERE IRONWOOD HAD 5.34 INCHES...ABOUT 135 PERCENT OF NORMAL. TOTAL
2013 PRECIPITATION AT IRONWOOD REACHED 47.72 INCHES AT THE END OF
OCTOBER...THE GREATEST JANUARY THROUGH OCTOBER TOTAL SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN THERE IN 1901. THE 2.01 INCHES THAT FELL AT COPPER HARBOR WAS
ONLY 60 PERCENT OF THE OCTOBER NORMAL.

PERIODS OF MODERATE TO HEAVY RAIN OCCURRED ACROSS UPPER MICHIGAN
FROM LATE ON 10/2 INTO 10/6 IN A VERY MOIST SOUTHWEST FLOW AHEAD OF
APPROACHING LOW PRESSURE IN THE PLAINS. MOST PLACES LOGGED 1 TO 2
INCHES OF RAIN DURING THIS PERIOD...BUT WATERSMEET IN GOGEBIC COUNTY
REPORTED AS MUCH AS 2.43 INCHES. SOME HEAVY RAIN ALSO FELL AT THE
END OF THE MONTH AS A DEEP...MOISTURE-LADEN LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM
MOVED FROM THE PLAINS THROUGH THE GREAT LAKES ON 10/31. AN INCH OR
MORE OF RAIN FELL OVER THE SOUTH CENTRAL AND EAST...WITH AS MUCH AS
1.48 INCHES NEAR BARK RIVER IN DELTA COUNTY ON HALLOWEEN.

THE FIRST ACCUMULATING SNOWS OF THE SEASON FELL OVER MAINLY THE
HIGHER TERRAIN OF THE WEST AND NORTH CENTRAL ON 10/21 IN THE CHILLY
NORTHWEST FLOW LEFT IN THE WAKE OF A LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM MOVING
THROUGH THE UPPER GREAT LAKES INTO SOUTHEAST CANADA. LAKE EFFECT
SNOW SHOWERS CONTINUED OVER THE HIGHER TERRAIN OF THE WEST AND NORTH
CENTRAL INTO 10/25. TOTAL WET SNOW ACCUMULATION ON 10/21 INTO 10/25
REACHED 6 TO 7 INCHES AT HERMAN IN BARAGA COUNTY AND ATLANTIC MINE
IN HOUGHTON COUNTY.

THE FIRST THREE WEEKS OF NOVEMBER 2013 FEATURED A VERY CHANGEABLE
WEATHER PATTERN OVER THE GREAT LAKES AS A RELATIVELY ZONAL UPPER
FLOW ALLOWED A SERIES OF TROUGHS AND RIDGES TO MOVE THROUGH THE
AREA. BUT THE WEATHER PATTERN THE LAST 10 DAYS OF THE MONTH SHIFTED
TO ONE DOMINATED BY A DEEP TROUGH OVER CENTRAL AND EASTERN NORTH
AMERICA DOWNSTREAM OF A RIDGE OVER THE WEST. EVEN THOUGH THE MERCURY
AVERAGED 1 TO 2 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL ON 11/1 THROUGH 11/21...THE
OVERALL NOVEMBER MEAN TEMPERATURE ENDED UP A DEGREE TO TWO BELOW
AVERAGE BECAUSE THE INFLUX OF VERY COLD CANADIAN AIR THE LAST 10
DAYS LOWERED THE MEAN DAILY TEMPERATURE ON SOME OF THOSE DAYS TO AS
MUCH AS 15 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL. THE FIRST SUB-ZERO MINIMUMS OF THE
NEW COLD SEASON OCCURRED AT SOME OF THE INTERIOR LOCATIONS ON
11/24...11/27 AND 11/29.

NOVEMBER 2013 WAS GENERALLY A WET MONTH...ESPECIALLY ACROSS THE EAST
HALF. MUNISING MEASURED 6.72 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION...ABOUT 180
PERCENT OF NORMAL. THE MONTH GOES DOWN IN THE RECORD BOOKS AS THE
SECOND WETTEST NOVEMBER AT MANISTIQUE AND NEWBERRY AND THE THIRD
WETTEST AT MUNISING. EVEN WHERE LESS PRECIPITATION FELL NEAR THE
WISCONSIN BORDER...THE NOVEMBER TOTALS ENDED UP 150 PERCENT OF THE
MONTHLY AVERAGE. MUCH OF THIS PRECIPITATION WAS ASSOCIATED WITH A
PAIR OF MOISTURE-LADEN LOW PRESSURE SYSTEMS. THE FIRST OF THESE
MOVED FROM THE CENTRAL PLAINS ON 11/5 THROUGH THE UPPER LAKES ON
11/6. THE HEAVIEST PRECIPITATION FELL OVER THE EAST...WHERE MUNISING
REPORTED 1.32 INCHES ON 11/5 AND 11/6. IT WAS COLD ENOUGH ACROSS THE
WEST FOR SOME SNOW...AND AS MUCH AS 7.2 INCHES OF WET SNOW
ACCUMULATED OVER THE HURON MOUNTAINS AT HERMAN. THE SECOND STRONG
LOW IN NOVEMBER TRACKED FROM THE PLAINS ACROSS THE WESTERN U.P. ON
11/17. SOME HEAVY RAIN...AND EVEN SOME RARE NOVEMBER
THUNDERSTORMS...STRUCK THE EAST HALF. AS MUCH AS 2.32 INCHES OF RAIN
INUNDATED NEWBERRY. AFTER THE DEEPENING LOW SHIFTED INTO ONTARIO...
NORTHWEST WINDS GUSTED AS HIGH AS 50 MPH FROM LATE ON 11/17 THROUGH
11/18.

SIMILAR TO THE PRECIPITATION...NOVEMBER SNOWFALL WAS WELL ABOVE
NORMAL OVER MOST OF THE EAST HALF. NEWBERRY WAS BURIED UNDER 35.2
INCHES OF THE WHITE STUFF...250 PERCENT OF THE TYPICAL NOVEMBER
SNOWFALL AND THE SECOND HIGHEST TO EVER FALL THERE DURING THE
ELEVENTH MONTH. NORTHWEST WINDS GUSTING AS HIGH AS 55 TO 60 MPH
BEHIND A SHARP COLD FRONTAL PASSAGE DROVE ARCTIC AIR INTO THE UPPER
LAKES ON 11/23 AND 11/24...RESULTING IN AS MUCH AS 6 TO 12 INCHES OF
LAKE EFFECT SNOW IN THE FAVORED SNOW BELTS...ESPECIALLY EAST OF
MARQUETTE. OTHER ROUNDS OF HEAVY LAKE EFFECT SNOWS FELL DURING COLD
SURGES FROM LATE ON 11/25 THROUGH 11/27 AND LATE ON 11/28 INTO
11/29. IRONWOOD MEASURED 15.6 INCHES OF SNOW ON 11/25 INTO 11/29. AS
MUCH AS 12 INCHES OF SNOW ACCUMULATED AT GARDEN IN DELTA COUNTY ON
THANKSGIVING DAY AS A SNOW BAND DEVELOPED OFF LAKE MICHIGAN IN THE
SOUTHERLY FLOW AHEAD OF A COLD FRONT THAT WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE
COLD SURGE FROM LATE ON 11/28 INTO 11/29. THE LACK OF LAKE EFFECT
SNOW BEFORE THE COLD AIR OUTBREAKS THE LAST 10 DAYS OF THE MONTH
HELD MONTHLY SNOWFALL BELOW AVERAGE OVER THE KEWEENAW. NOVEMBER
SNOWFALL OF 1 TO 3 INCHES OVER MOST OF THE SOUTH CENTRAL WAS AROUND
ONLY 25 PERCENT OF NORMAL.

ALTHOUGH A WEST-TO-EAST PACIFIC FLOW RESULTED IN ABOVE NORMAL
TEMPERATURES THE FIRST COUPLE DAYS OF DECEMBER 2013...THE MONTH WAS
DOMINATED BY A COLD NORTHWEST FLOW OF ARCTIC AIR AROUND A PERSISTENT
TROUGH OVER EASTERN NORTH AMERICA. THE RESULT WAS A TOP 10 COLDEST
DECEMBER ALMOST EVERYWHERE...AND EVEN THE THIRD COLDEST ON RECORD AT
NEWBERRY AND ONTONAGON. THE MEAN MONTHLY TEMPERATURE WAS AN
IMPRESSIVE 6 TO 10 DEGREES BELOW THE LONG-TERM DECEMBER AVERAGE. THE
SECOND WEEK OF DECEMBER WAS PARTICULARLY COLD. MEAN DAILY
TEMPERATURES FROM 12/6 THROUGH 12/16 AVERAGED 10 TO AS MUCH AS 20
DEGREES BELOW NORMAL. ANOTHER BITTERLY COLD AIRMASS INVADED THE
GREAT LAKES AT THE END OF THE MONTH...LOWERING MEAN DAILY
TEMPERATURES ON 12/30 AND 12/31 TO AROUND 20 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL.
THE MERCURY FAILED TO RISE ABOVE ZERO AT SOME PLACES OVER THE WEST
ON THESE DAYS...INCLUDING A FRIGID -6 HIGH AT IRONWOOD ON 12/31.
WIND CHILLS ON 12/30 AND 12/31 WERE AS LOW AS 35 BELOW ZERO.

SINCE ONLY ONE MOISTURE-LADEN LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM INFLUENCED UPPER
MICHIGAN IN DECEMBER...MONTHLY PRECIPITATION TENDED TO BE NEAR OR
BELOW NORMAL. THE EXCEPTION WAS OVER THE NORTHWEST U.P. BECAUSE THAT
AREA PICKED UP NEARLY CONTINUOUS LAKE EFFECT SNOW FROM 12/5 THROUGH
12/31. MONTHLY WATER EQUIVALENT PRECIPITATION APPROACHED OR EXCEEDED
4 INCHES IN THIS AREA...UP TO 200 PERCENT OF NORMAL AT HOUGHTON.
DECEMBER SNOWFALL EXCEEDED 100 INCHES AT A FEW LOCATIONS IN HOUGHTON
COUNTY...INCLUDING 102.7 INCHES AND 102.5 INCHES AT PAINESDALE AND
ATLANTIC MINE RESPECTIVELY.

THE ONE DEEP LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM TO IMPACT THE AREA IN DECEMBER
MOVED FROM THE PLAINS THROUGH WISCONSIN ON 12/4 AND THEN ACROSS
WESTERN UPPER MICHIGAN ON 12/5. LIQUID EQUIVALENT PRECIPITATION
DURING THIS EVENT REACHED 1.00 TO AS MUCH AS 1.75 INCHES. UP TO 9
INCHES OF SNOW ACCUMULATED OVER WESTERN UPPER MICHIGAN AT REDRIDGE
IN HOUGHTON COUNTY DURING THIS EVENT...BUT ENOUGH WARM AIR FLOWED
INTO THE UPPER GREAT LAKES TO CHANGE THE PRECIPITATION TO A WINTRY
MIX...ESPECIALLY OVER THE EAST AND CENTRAL. EAST WINDS GUSTING AS
HIGH AS 35 MPH OVER THE KEWEENAW AHEAD OF THE LOW ON 12/4 SHIFTED TO
THE NORTHWEST AND GUSTED AS HIGH AS 50 MPH ON 12/5 AFTER THE LOW
SHIFTED TO THE NORTH...RESULTING IN CONSIDERABLE BLOWING SNOW. WHERE
FREEZING RAIN WAS MOST PERSISTENT ACROSS THE CENTRAL AND WEST...UP
TO 0.25 INCH OF ICE ACCUMULATED.

SOME OTHER NOTABLE EVENTS IN DECEMBER INCLUDED A CLIPPER TYPE LOW
THAT MOVED THROUGH THE UPPER GREAT LAKES ON 12/14 INTO 12/15. AS
MUCH AS 13 INCHES OF SNOW FELL NEAR FAYETTE IN DELTA COUNTY AHEAD OF
THIS LOW...AND NORTHWEST WINDS GUSTING UP TO 45 MPH IN ITS WAKE
RESULTED IN CONSIDERABLE BLOWING SNOW NEAR LAKE SUPERIOR. NEGAUNEE
IN MARQUETTE COUNTY WAS BURIED UNDER 13.5 INCHES OF LAKE ENHANCED
SNOW ON 12/22 THROUGH 12/23 ON THE NORTHERN FLANK OF A LOW PRESSURE
SYSTEM PASSING THROUGH THE LOWER GREAT LAKES. LAKE EFFECT SNOW OFF
LAKE MICHIGAN ACCUMULATED AS MUCH AS 12.0 INCHES AT DOLLARVILLE IN
LUCE COUNTY ON 12/24. A SITE NEAR SILVER CITY IN ONTONAGON COUNTY
SAW ALMOST 17 INCHES OF LAKE EFFECT SNOW ON CHRISTMAS INTO 12/26.
FINALLY...HEAVY LAKE EFFECT SNOWS ACCOMPANYING THE LATE MONTH ARCTIC
BLAST DROPPED UP TO 15.0 INCHES AT MOHAWK IN KEWEENAW COUNTY ON
12/29 THROUGH 12/31.


ALL CLIMATE DATA LISTED IN THIS PRODUCT ARE UNOFFICIAL. FOR OFFICIAL
DATA...PLEASE REFER TO THE NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER. CONTACT
THE NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER AT (828) 271-4800 OR
WWW.NCDC.NOAA.GOV. ALSO NOTE THIS DISCUSSION DOES NOT INCLUDE DATA
FROM CHIPPEWA AND MACKINAC COUNTIES.





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