Public Information Statement
Issued by NWS Marquette, MI

Home | Current Version | Previous Version | Text Only | Print | Product List | Glossary On
Versions: 1 2 3 4 5
133
NOUS43 KMQT 221542
PNSMQT

CLIMATE REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MARQUETTE MI
1143 PM EDT Mon May 22 2017

...West and Central Upper Michigan Climate Summary for 2016...

...Top Ten Warmest Year at Most Places...
...Above Normal Precipitation at Most Places...
...Variable Snowfall...
...Great Lakes Water Levels Remain Above Normal...

Although April into July and December 2016 featured near to below
normal temperatures, overall warmer than normal weather the rest of
the year resulted in a top 5 to 10 warmest year at most locations
and across Upper Michigan.  At Manistique, 2016 goes down in the
record books as the third warmest.  Mean annual temperatures ranging
between about 42 and 45 degrees ended up 1.5 to 3.0 degrees above
normal at most locations.

The weather pattern was an active one overall in 2016, so annual
precipitation that ranged between about 30 inches and 48 inches at
most places ended up above to well above average. At Manistique and
Ironwood, 2016 is now the second and third wettest year on record
respectively. The 47.19 inches of precipitation that inundated
Ironwood during the year was over a foot above the yearly normal.
During the warm season in 2016, a total of six EF-0 or EF-1
tornadoes touched down in Upper Michigan.

While 2016 annual snowfall tended to run above normal and over 200
inches in those areas favored for lake effect snow with northwest
winds, snow totals were near to below average away from these areas
despite the heavier precipitation due to the warmer-than-average
temperatures that prevailed much of the time and caused more of the
precipitation to fall as rain during the marginally cold events.
Painesdale in Houghton County led reporting stations with 335.9
inches of snow in 2016. As is almost always the case, locations over
the south central measured the least snow.  Menominee reported only
42.6 inches, the lowest 2016 total in Upper Michigan.
____________________________________________________________________
          ...Some 2016 Superlatives...

Highest Calendar Year Snowfall...333.7 inches at Painesdale in
                                  Houghton County

Greatest Snow Depth...52 Inches at Painesdale on 2/9

Lowest Snowfall...42.6 Inches at Menominee

Highest Precipitation...47.19 Inches at Ironwood

Lowest Precipitation...27.25 Inches at Escanaba

Highest Snowfall...333.7 Inches at Painesdale in Houghton County

Lowest Snowfall...42.6 Inches at Menominee

Highest Temperature...96 at Stonington in Delta County on 7/22

Lowest Temperature...-40 at Amasa in Iron County on 2/14
____________________________________________________________________
NWS Marquette Statistics /Record 1961 to Present/

...7th Warmest Year...
...11th Wettest Year...

                                2016 /2015/  1981-2010      2016
                                 Observed      Normal    Departure
Annual Average Temperature /F/  42.2 /40.7/     40.1        +2.1

Annual Average High Temp /F/    51.1 /50.1/     49.8        +1.3

Annual Average Low Temp /F/     33.3 /31.3/     30.4        +2.9

Precipitation /Inches/         40.27 /29.77/   35.68       +4.59

Snowfall /Inches/              190.3 /122.3/   203.3       -13.0

Lowest Temperature /F/          -22 on 2/14

Highest Temperature /F/          89 on 7/20 and 7/21
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Marquette City Statistics /Record 1875 to Present/

...22nd Wettest Year...

                                2016 /2015/  1981-2010      2016
                                 Observed      Normal    Departure
Annual Average Temperature /F/  **** /43.0/     43.2        ****

Annual Average High Temp /F/    **** /50.3/     50.3        ****

Annual Average Low Temp /F/     **** /35.8/     36.2        ****

Precipitation /Inches/         36.10 /28.19/   29.13       +6.97

Snowfall /Inches/              104.6 /61.8/    117.2       -12.6

Lowest Temperature /F/           -4 on 12/19

Highest Temperature /F/          91 on 7/21, 7/22 and 7/23

**** Unable to calculate due to some missing data
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Ironwood Statistics /Record 1901 to Present/

...3rd Wettest Year...
...12th Highest Calendar Year Snowfall...
...12th Warmest Year...

                                2016 /2015/  1981-2010      2016
                                 Observed      Normal    Departure
Annual Average Temperature /F/  42.4 /41.1/     40.1        +2.3

Annual Average High Temp /F/    51.5 /50.7/     49.8        +1.7

Annual Average Low Temp /F/     33.3 /31.6/     30.4        +2.9

Precipitation /Inches/         47.19 /38.96/   34.93      +12.26

Snowfall /Inches/              212.2 /116.9/   188.2       +24.0

Lowest Temperature /F/          -16 on 2/14

Highest Temperature /F/          89 on 5/6
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Iron Mountain Statistics /Record 1899 to Present/

...5th Warmest Year...

                                2016 /2015/  1981-2010      2016
                                 Observed      Normal    Departure
Annual Average Temperature /F/  45.0 /43.2/     42.3        +2.7

Annual Average High Temp /F/    55.3 /53.8/     53.6        +1.7

Annual Average Low Temp /F/     34.7 /32.5/     31.0        +3.7

Precipitation /Inches/         30.95 /33.97/   29.72       +1.23

Snowfall /Inches/               57.3 /34.2/     58.4        -1.1

Lowest Temperature /F/          -20 on 12/19

Highest Temperature /F/          94 on 7/22
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Newberry Statistics /Record 1899 to Present/

...6th Warmest Year...
...10th Highest Calendar Year Snowfall...
...13th Wettest Year...

                                2016 /2015/  1981-2010      2016
                                 Observed      Normal    Departure
Annual Average Temperature /F/  44.3 /42.1/     42.0        +2.3

Annual Average High Temp /F/    52.3 /50.6/     51.2        +1.1

Annual Average Low Temp /F/     36.4 /33.6/     32.7        +3.7

Precipitation /Inches/         35.91 /30.34/   34.21       +1.70

Snowfall /Inches/              176.5 /105.4/   132.2       +44.3

Lowest Temperature /F/          -14 on 2/13

Highest Temperature /F/          88 on 7/26 and 8/3
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Houghton County Airport Statistics /Record 1887 to Present/

...6th Warmest Year...
...13th Highest Calendar Year Snowfall...
...15th Wettest Year...

                                2016 /2015/  1981-2010      2016
                                 Observed      Normal    Departure
Annual Average Temperature /F/  43.4 /41.7/     40.5        +2.9

Annual Average High Temp /F/    51.6 /50.5/     49.0        +2.6

Annual Average Low Temp /F/     35.1 /33.0/     31.9        +3.2

Precipitation /Inches/         40.17 /27.36/   32.18       +7.99

Snowfall /Inches/              245.8 /153.7/   207.7       +38.1

Lowest Temperature /F/           -8 ON 3/3 and 12/19

Highest Temperature /F/          89 on 5/6 and 6/19
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Munising Statistics /Record 1911 to Present/

...5th Warmest Year...

                                2015 /2014/  1981-2010      2015
                                 Observed      Normal    Departure
Annual Average Temperature /F/  43.7 /41.1/     42.0        +1.7

Annual Average High Temp /F/    50.9 /48.7/     49.9        +1.0

Annual Average Low Temp /F/     36.4 /33.5/     34.0        +2.4

Precipitation /Inches/          **** /37.58/   38.45        ****

Snowfall /Inches/               **** /115.6/   152.1        ****

Lowest Temperature /F/           -9 on 12/19

Highest Temperature /F/          90 on 7/13

**** Unable to calculate due to some missing data
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Manistique Statistics /Record 1896 to Present/

...2nd Wettest Year...
...3rd Warmest Year...

                                2016 /2015/  1981-2010      2016
                                 Observed      Normal    Departure
Annual Average Temperature /F/  44.0 /41.3/     41.8        +2.2

Annual Average High Temp /F/    51.6 /49.1/     49.9        +1.7

Annual Average Low Temp /F/     36.4 /33.6/     33.7        +2.7

Precipitation /Inches/         38.15 /28.52/   30.17       +7.98

Snowfall /Inches/               69.2 /40.8/     74.4        -5.2

Lowest Temperature /F/          -12 on 2/14

Highest Temperature /F/          90 on 7/22
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Stambaugh /Iron County/ Statistics

                                2016 /2015/
                                 Observed
Annual Average Temperature /F/  41.0 /38.8/

Precipitation /Inches/         37.25 /30.80/

Snowfall /Inches/               62.8 /39.0/

Lowest Temperature /F/          -39 on 2/14

Highest Temperature /F/          89 on 7/21 and 7/22
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Garden Corners /Delta County/ Statistics

                                2016 /2015/
                                 Observed
Annual Average Temperature /F/  44.2 /41.6/

Precipitation /Inches/         34.79 /38.05/

Snowfall /Inches/               82.2 /51.4/

Lowest Temperature /F/          -22 on 2/14

Highest Temperature /F/          94 on 7/22
____________________________________________________________________
Great Lakes Water Levels (Feet Above Mean Sea Level)

...Great Lakes Water Levels Remain Above Normal in 2016...

                            Lake Superior  Lake Michigan-Huron
                            Obs/Norm /Diff    Obs/Norm /Diff
01/01/16 Daily Mean       602.3/601.5/+0.8  579.4/578.4/+1.0
02/01/16 Daily Mean       602.1/601.3/+0.8  579.2/578.4/+0.8
03/01/16 Daily Mean       601.9/601.1/+0.8  579.3/578.4/+0.9
04/01/16 Daily Mean       602.0/601.2/+0.8  579.8/578.7/+1.1
05/01/16 Daily Mean       602.0/601.6/+0.4  580.1/579.0/+1.1
06/01/16 Daily Mean       602.1/601.8/+0.3  580.1/579.2/+0.9
07/01/16 Daily Mean       602.6/602.1/+0.5  580.2/579.3/+0.9
08/01/16 Daily Mean       602.7/602.1/+0.6  580.1/579.3/+0.8
09/01/16 Daily Mean       602.7/602.1/+0.6  580.1/579.1/+1.0
10/01/16 Daily Mean       602.7/602.1/+0.6  579.8/578.9/+0.9
11/01/16 Daily Mean       602.5/601.9/+0.6  579.5/578.7/+0.8
12/01/16 Daily Mean       602.3/601.7/+0.6  579.2/578.5/+0.7
12/31/16 Daily Mean       602.0/601.5/+0.5  579.0/578.4/+0.6

Although 2016 was much warmer than 2015 and there was much less ice
cover on the Great Lakes during the winter into spring in 2016
compared to 2015, much greater precipitation and runoff into the
western Great Lakes in 2016 resulted in continued above normal
levels on Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron. For most of 2016, the
lake levels were 6 to 12 inches above normal.
____________________________________________________________________
...2016 SUMMARY...

The ongoing El Nino event during the winter of 2015-16, marked by
above normal water temperatures in the eastern tropical Pacific
Ocean and a fast west-to-east flow that limited the intrusions of
colder arctic air into the Upper Great Lakes, was the cause of the
warmth that prevailed in January through March 2016. The mean
monthly temperatures across Upper Michigan in both January and
February ended up 2 to 4 degrees above normal. March was even warmer
with an average temperature 3 to 6 degrees above the monthly mean,
resulting in a top ten warmest third month at some locations.

The west-to-east flow that prevailed in January did give way to a
deep upper trough over central North America during the middle of
the month, when frequent lake effect or lake enhanced snows fell
during the accompanying cold air outbreaks near Lake Superior,
mainly in areas favored by northwest winds. As much as about 90
inches of snow fell over the higher terrain of the Keweenaw during
January, including the monthly maximum of about 94 inches at
Painesdale in Houghton County. Much of this fell as lake effect
during the mid-month cold spell. Because only one larger low
pressure system influenced Upper Michigan weather in January, areas
away from these favored snow belts saw below normal precipitation
and snowfall. Menominee reported only 3.9 inches of snow in January.

Since only one moisture laden low pressure system impacted the Upper
Lakes in February, precipitation and snowfall over the south central
ended up below normal in that area. Escanaba measured only 0.51 inch
of water equivalent precipitation and 8.4 inches of snow. But the
moistening and destabilization associated with the relatively warm
waters of Lake Superior enhanced precipitation and snowfall totals
accompanying the passage of the more frequent weaker disturbances at
most places away from the south central. In fact, Ironwood observed
a February record 61.7 inches of snow, more than double the monthly
normal.

Although more larger scale low pressure systems tracked through the
Upper Lakes in March and caused above normal precipitation at most
locations, the overall warmth resulted in rain as the main
precipitation type more frequently than normal. So, monthly snowfall
was below normal and as little as about a third of the March average
at many spots. One storm system tracking through the Great Lakes did
drop as much as 10 to 20 inches of wet, heavy snow over the higher
terrain of the west and north central Upper Peninsula on 3/17.

When the ongoing El Nino weakened by early April, the weather
pattern across North America abruptly changed to one that featured a
deep upper trough over central and eastern North America for all but
the third week of the month. April thus ended up 2 to 4 degrees
cooler than normal across Upper Michigan despite some very warm
weather during that third week. The month ended up among the top ten
coolest Aprils at a few spots.

Several deep low pressure systems that moved through the trough near
Upper Michigan supported above to well above normal precipitation
during April. Most places saw at least 3 inches of water equivalent
precipitation during the month. Up to 4.10 inches fell at Ironwood,
a little more than 150 percent of normal. Since much of the
precipitation fell as snow when unseasonably chilly air prevailed
the first two weeks, monthly snowfall was also well above average.
In fact, several locations saw a top ten heaviest April snowfall,
including the maximum 40.9 inches that accumulated at the Marquette
National Weather Service Office near Negaunee in Marquette County.
This third highest April snowfall is almost 300 percent of the
monthly normal for that location.

The cool weather at the end of April persisted through the first
half of May, after which a building upper ridge over the east half
of North America brought much warmer to Upper Michigan. Since the
last two weeks of May were so warm, the monthly mean temperature
ended up a bit above normal. Even though the first half of May was
cool, there was one very warm day on 5/6, when the mercury reached
the monthly maximum of 93 at Kenton in southern Houghton County. On
the other hand, 5/14 was quite cool with record low maximum
temperatures holding in the 30s at some locations. Many places also
saw some snow on this chilly day.

The first three weeks of May were dry with less than an inch of
liquid equivalent precipitation at most places. But a deep southwest
flow aloft on the western flank of the upper ridge resulted in a
much wetter pattern the last week of so of the month. Watersmeet in
Gogebic County measured the most May precipitation with 6.25 inches.
Of this total, 5.25 inches fell from 5/24 through 5/29. During the
active weather pattern during this period, there were two EF-1
tornadoes near Republic in Marquette County on 5/24. Since the
southeast portion of Upper Michigan was closer to the stabilizing
influence of the upper ridge, much less precipitation fell in that
area. Newberry measured only 1.12 inches of precipitation the whole
month, less than 50 percent of the May normal.

The weather pattern in June was a changeable one, with the monthly
mean temperature tending to balance out to near normal across the
area. Even though there were times when high pressure dominated in
this pattern, there were also periods of heavy rainfall when an
upper trough was in place. Once again, the heaviest rains tended to
fall over northwest Upper Michigan, where 4 inches of more of rain
was common. Ironwood measured 6.42 inches, about 175 percent of the
monthly normal. There was also a swath of heavier rain over the far
south central, where Menominee reported 6.40 inches. Even where
there was less rain from Crystal Falls to Gwinn in Marquette County,
Munising and Newberry, at least 2.25 inches of rain fell during
June, about 75 percent of the average.

Even though the first half of July featured cooler weather most of
that time under an upper trough that dominated the east half of
North America, an upper ridge building over the western Great Lakes
during the week from 7/20 through 7/26 caused so much warmth that
the monthly mean temperature ended up a bit above normal.

As is typical in the summer, the July precipitation was variable
because of the hit-or-miss nature of the convective showers and
thunderstorms the prevail during the summer months. But since the
changeable weather pattern was also an active one, most places ended
up with above normal precipitation. Locations over the far west near
Ironwood and Ontonagon generally picked up the heaviest rains, in
excess of 6 inches at some locations, including 6.28 inches at
Bergland Dam in Ontonagon County. Only 2.32 inches fell at Iron
Mountain, about two-thirds of the July normal.

The most significant outbreak of thunderstorms impacted western
Upper Michigan during the night of 7/11-7/12. The most intense
storms occurred in western Gogebic County, where there were damaging
wind gusts in excess of 90 mph near Wakefield as well as an EF-1
tornado near Bessemer during the early morning hours on 7/12. As
much as 10 inches of rain inundated some places in western Gogebic
County, causing some intense flash flooding in areas west of
Ironwood.

Heavy showers and thunderstorms dropped some heavy rain that was as
much as 2.46 inches near Manistique on 7/8. One of the stronger
storms in that outbreak also caused a weak tornado near Newberry.
Another round of severe storms rolled into western Upper Michigan
around sunrise on 7/21, causing damaging wind gusts in excess of 90
mph at a few spots.

A very similar weather pattern that featured a southwest flow aloft
over the western Great Lakes on the northwest flank of an upper
ridge across the southeast states prevailed in August and September.
This pattern resulted in above normal temperatures, especially the
overnight minimums, and above normal rainfall, mainly over the
northwest half of the U.P. The mean monthly temperature ended up 2
to 4 degrees above normal in August and 3 to 5 degrees above average
in September. This anomalous warmth resulted in a top ten warmest
August and September at many locations. In fact, September 2016 goes
down in the record books as the warmest ninth month on record at
Manistique.

The predominating southwest flow aloft transported moist airmasses
into the Upper Great Lakes in August and September. Frequent
episodes of showers and thunderstorms resulted as passing
disturbances interacted with this moisture. Many places over the
northwest half measured 5 inches or more of rain in August and over
6 inches in September. Herman in Baraga County was inundated with
7.18 inches of rain in August, while Atlantic Mine in Houghton
County picked up 7.34 inches in September.  These totals are about
double the normal rainfall for those months. Areas over the east
around Newberry saw the least rain in August with just under 3
inches. In September, a swath from Iron Mountain to Escanaba
measured the lowest precipitation between 3.5 and 4 inches. But for
both months, these minimum totals are at least close to the August
and September averages.

There were two significant heavy rain episodes that impacted Upper
Michigan in August 2016. A cool front sagging south into the Upper
Great Lakes on 8/10 stalled over the south central. As an upper
disturbance moved east over this boundary and drew in the warm and
humid airmass to the south, as much as 4.88 inches and 4.34 inches
of rain fell near Ensign in Delta County and Atlantic Mine
respectively on 8/10 into 8/11. These heavy rains caused flash
flooding that washed out some roads in Houghton County near Hancock.
There was also an EF-1 tornado in Menominee near Hermansville in
Menominee County on 8/11, fortunately in a rural, unpopulated area.

A more widespread rain struck the areas on 8/19 into early 8/21 as
an upper disturbance and surface low pressure system moved northeast
over a stationary front extending from Iowa into the Upper Lakes.
The warm and humid airmass to the southeast of this boundary
provided the fuel to cause the heavy rain that added up to at least
2 inches at many locations. Herman reported the most precipitation
on 8/19 into 8/21, an impressive 4.26 inches. North winds gusting as
high as 50 mph near Lake Superior behind the passing low pressure
whipped up high waves on the lake that caused some lakeshore
flooding and beach erosion at exposed locations along the shore.

A slow moving cold front lifted a very warm and humid airmass in
place across Upper Michigan on 9/5 into 9/7, resulting in another
round of heavy rain. Between Labor Day and 9/7, as much as 2.93
inches of rain inundated Atlantic Mine. Another cold frontal passage
on 9/16 dropped as much as 2.20 inches of rain on Arnold in
Marquette County.

A warm Pacific flow of air dominated the Great Lakes in October
2016, resulting in a mean monthly temperature between 3 and 5
degrees above normal. As was the case in August and September, the
monthly warmth was due mainly to anomalously high overnight minimum
temperatures.

Although October precipitation was near to below normal at most
places, an area from near Iron Mountain to Munising ended up with
well above normal rainfall because a cluster of heavy showers and
thunderstorms ahead of an approaching cold front impacted that area
late on 10/17 into the early morning of 10/18. Many locations under
that swath picked up 3 to 5 inches of rain during this event, with
as much as 5.10 inches falling at Gwinn in Marquette County. This
torrential rainfall caused some flooding, especially along the
Chocolay River in Marquette County that resulted in washed out
bridges, closed roads and some evacuations.

At those areas impacted by the heavy rain on 10/17 into 10/18,
October rainfall reached as much as 7.13 inches at Munising, the
fourth highest October precipitation on record for the site and
almost 175 percent of normal. Monthly precipitation away from this
area was generally under 3 inches. The 2.39 inches of rain that fell
at Houghton is only about 80 percent of the October average there.
Due to the overall monthly warmth, October snowfall was negligible.

The same west-to-east flow of Pacific warm air responsible for the
October warmth persisted in November, which ended up even warmer
than the month before. In fact, with a mean monthly temperature that
ended up 7 to 10 degrees above normal, November 2016 goes down in
the record books as one of the top three warmest eleventh months
ever across all of Upper Michigan. At Manistique, Munising,
Marquette, and Houghton, November 2016 is the warmest on record. The
first half of the month was particularly warm under an upper ridge
and featured many days when the mercury peaked in the 70s at at
least a few locations along with mean daily temperatures up to 20 to
25 degrees above normal. Readings on 11/6 reached 72 at Houghton,
the warmest ever November temperature on record for that location.

Since September, October and November well all very warm months, the
meteorological fall of 2016 ended up as one of the top three warmest
on record across Upper Michigan and the warmest autumn at Newberry,
Manistique, and the Marquette NWS Office.

Since there relatively few strong low pressure systems embedded in
the Pacific flow and lake effect snows were below normal with the
warmer airmasses prevailing, monthly precipitation was near to below
average. Garden Corners reported the most November precipitation
with a near normal 2.75 inches. But the monthly totals of 1.18
inches at Baraga and 1.87 inches at Newberry were no more than 50 to
60 percent of normal.  The near absence of arctic air and lake
effect snows as well deep, moisture-laden low pressure systems
resulted in well below normal November snowfall.  Ironwood picked up
the most snowfall, but the 16.9 inches that accumulated there in
November is only a bit less than 70 percent of average. Only a trace
of snow fell all month from Menominee to Escanaba and Manistique.

The anomalously warm pattern that dominated in November persisted
through the first week of December. Although more warm weather
returned at times after 12/20, a change in the weather pattern to
one that featured a deep upper trough across central North America
and very cold air in the Upper Lakes at mid month resulted in a near
balance of the temperature extremes that dominated during the
different weather patterns. The December 2016 mean monthly
temperature thus ended up from near normal to one degree above
average.

Some of the more anomalous temperature extremes in December included
minimums above freezing at at least a few spots on 12/1 through 12/6
and on 12/24. On the cold side, the thermometer never broke the zero
mark at Ironwood on 12/18.  On this the coldest day of the month
overall when mean daily temperatures were up to 25 degrees below
average, the mercury at Ironwood peaked at a frigid -2.

During the period from 12/7 through 12/19 that was dominated by a
near steady flow of the arctic air over the relatively warm waters
of Lake Superior, lake effect snows fell almost continuously in the
snow belts favored by west to northwest winds. In combination with
the snow that accompanied the passage of three deep low pressure
systems that influenced Upper Michigan during the month as well as
additional lake effect snows that fell at the end of December, as
much as 103 inches of snow piled up at Painesdale in Houghton County
during the month. December water equivalent precipitation that
topped out at 5.28 inches at Atlantic Mine ended up around 250
percent of normal at some places in the lake effect snow belts
favored by the west-to-northwest winds that prevailed during the
arctic air outbreaks. Even over south central Upper Michigan that
missed out on the lake effect snows, the active December weather
pattern resulted in above normal precipitation and snowfall. Most
places in that area reported 1.50 to 2.50 inches of liquid
equivalent precipitation and 15 to 25 inches of snow, as much as 125
to 150 percent of the December normal at those locations.


ALL CLIMATE DATA LISTED IN THIS PRODUCT ARE UNOFFICIAL. FOR OFFICIAL
DATA...PLEASE REFER TO THE NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER. CONTACT
THE NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER AT (828) 271-4800 OR
WWW.NCDC.NOAA.GOV. ALSO NOTE THIS DISCUSSION DOES NOT INCLUDE DATA
FROM CHIPPEWA AND MACKINAC COUNTIES.



USA.gov is the U.S. government's official web portal to all federal, state and local government web resources and services.