Drought Information Statement
Issued by NWS Bismarck, ND

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Drought Information Statement
National Weather Service Bismarck ND
411 PM CDT Tue Jun 27 2017 /311 PM MDT Tue Jun 27 2017/

...SEVERE TO EXTREME DROUGHT CONDITIONS ACROSS WESTERN AND CENTRAL
NORTH DAKOTA...


SYNOPSIS...
Drought severity has continued to worsen across western
and central North Dakota throughout May and June as precipitation
deficits mount. This has resulted in a depletion of moisture from
the late winter and early spring snowmelt within the upper soil
zone. While crops and rangeland are currently bearing the brunt of
what is thus far a meteorologic and agricultural drought, small
streams and stock ponds are also increasingly showing stress from
the lack of precipitation.

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor produced on June 20, 2017, a
D2 Severe Drought designation was depicted across much of central
and southwest North Dakota, with pockets of D3 Extreme Drought
across the far northwest, portions of the southwest and from upper
Lake Oahe into southern Ward county in central North Dakota.

Below is a summary of precipitation from March 1 through June 25,
2017.

Location.....Precipitation Received.....How Far Below Normal

Hettinger.........1.14 inches.............-5.81 inches
Minot.............2.46 inches.............-5.07 inches
Dickinson.........2.63 inches.............-4.53 inches
Bismarck..........3.00 inches.............-4.19 inches
Jamestown.........4.45 inches.............-2.90 inches
Williston.........3.62 inches.............-2.09 inches


STATE AND LOCAL ACTIONS...
The Governor of North Dakota has declared a drought emergency for
26 counties across North Dakota in a coordinated drought response
with other state agencies including the State Water Commission,
Department of Emergency Services, Forest Service and Department of
Agriculture. This declaration activates state programs to assist
farmers and ranchers in affected counties impacted by the drought.
Coordination with county and city commissions, law enforcement,
and emergency management has also been extensive regarding
agriculture impacts and potential fire danger.


SOIL MOISTURE CONDITIONS...
Soil moisture content in the upper several inches of the ground
continues to fall across much of the area. Multiple soil moisture
analyses indicate that moisture has fallen to the 5th-10th driest
percentiles across much of western into south central North Dakota.


RIVER AND STREAM FLOW CONDITIONS...
Below normal streamflows are observed across most of the Missouri
River Basin tributaries. This is especially true of the Little
Missouri River where flows are below the 10th percentile for June.
Low flows of only 5-10 CFS are being observed in the Marmarth and
Medora areas, and around 40-50 CFS in the Watford City area. This is
compared to a median flow between 400-500 CFS near Medora, and 600-
700 CFS near Watford City for this time of the year.


AGRICULTURE IMPACTS...
The greatest impacts have been to the agricultural sector of
western and central North Dakota. This is especially true to the
livestock industry. Hay shortages, stressed pasture land and
increased sulfates in watering holes have greatly challenged
ranchers across western and central North Dakota. Non-irrigated row
crop farming is also challenged by very late or poor germination,
growth, and expectations for reduced yields.


FIRE DANGER HAZARDS...
Fire restrictions and bans, including the use of fireworks, are
in place across much of western and central North Dakota. Cool
season native vegetation continues to cure from the spring, and warm
season grasses are being stressed by a lack of soil moisture. This
would suggest an earlier than normal increase in fire danger. For
example, fire danger in July may well be what is normally not
expected until August and September when fuels usually begin to dry
out across the area.


PRECIPITATION/TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK...
Above normal temperatures, and near to below normal precipitation
are favored across western and central North Dakota for the first
week of July. Summer precipitation patterns associated with
thunderstorms can be highly variable, even across small distances.
Furthermore, curing grasses, and the lack of high soil moisture
content reduces evapotranspiration across the area as a moisture
source for thunderstorm development.


HYDROLOGIC SUMMARY AND OUTLOOK...
With the lack of a strong precipitation signal suggesting a
reversal of precipitation deficits, already stressed hydrologic
conditions are only favored to worsen into July. Thereafter, as
western and central North Dakota climatologically dries out into
August, hydrologic conditions will have to be closely monitored
through the late summer baring any significant pattern shift.


NEXT ISSUANCE DATE... This product will be updated in early July,
or sooner if necessary in response to significant changes in
conditions.

&&

Related web sites...
additional information on current drought conditions may be found
at the following web addresses /use lower case letters/...

U.S. Drought Monitor...http://www.droughtmonitor.unl.edu
National Integrated Drought Information System...
http://www.drought.gov
CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov
Midwestern Regional Climate Center...
http://mcc.sws.uiuc.edu/index.jsp
High Plains Regional Climate Center...http://hprcc.unl.edu
NWS River Information...http://www.weather.gov/ahps
USGS River Information...http://water.usgs.gov
US Army Corps of Engineer...http://www.mvr.usace.army.mil

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...
The Drought Monitor is a multi-agency effort involving NOAA`s
National Weather Service and National Climatic Data Center...the
USDA...state and regional center climatologists and the National
Drought Mitigation Center. Information for this statement has
been gathered from NWS and FAA observation sites...State
Cooperative Extension Services...the USDA...USACE and USGS.

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS...
If you have any questions or comments about this Drought
Information Statement...please contact...

National Weather Service
2301 University Drive Bldg 27
Bismarck, ND 58504
Phone...701-250-4224
bis.webmaster@noaa.gov

&&
PJA/AJS



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