Public Information Statement
Issued by NWS St. Louis, MO

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Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Saint Louis MO
905 AM CDT WED JUL 20 2016

TO:     Family of Services /FOS/ subscribers,
        NOAA Weather Wire Service /NWWS/ SUBSCRIBERS,
        Emergency Managers, Weather Information Network
        /EMWIN/ subscribers, NOAAPORT subscribers,
        other National Weather Service /NWS/ users and
        partners, and NWS employees

FROM:   Mark Fuchs
        Service Hydrologist
        WFO St. Louis, Missouri

SUBJECT Change in moderate and major flood stages for the
        Mississippi River at the downtown Quincy, Illinois
        gage and the tailwater gage at Quincy Lock and Dam
        #21 effective this morning at 9 a.m. CDT

This morning at 9 a.m. CDT, the National Weather Service in St.
Louis updated the moderate and major flood stages for the downtown
Quincy gage and the tailwater gage at Quincy Lock and Dam #21.  This
will be a better reflection of the known impacts along this part of
the Mississippi River.  The initial flood stage of 17 feet will
remain unchanged at both locations.

For the downtown gage at Mississippi River at Quincy, the previous
moderate flood stage was 18 feet.  The new moderate flood stage will
be 22 feet.  The previous major flood stage was 22.5 feet.  The new
major flood stage will be 26 feet.

For the tailwater gage at Lock and Dam 21 below Quincy, the previous
moderate flood stage was 18 feet.  The new moderate flood stage will
be 21 feet.  The previous major flood stage was 22 feet.  The new
major flood stage will be 25 feet.

While flood stage for these locations remains unchanged, these are
being reviewed for a possible future adjustment.  Flood stage is the
river level at which minimal human impact from floodwaters begins,
and the level at which the National Weather Service begins issuing
river flood warnings.

Moderate and major flood stages are levels at which human impact
increases noticably.  At moderate levels, numerous secondary roads
are often inundated and some outbuildings may be flooded.  At major
levels, primary roads and highways typically flood, along with
residences and businesses.  Whenever these higher thresholds are
expected to be exceeded, the National Weather Service will issue
flood warnings to alert the public to the likelihood of more
significant flooding.

$$

Fuchs


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