Climatological Report (Annual)
Issued by NWS Portland, ME

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CXUS51 KGYX 092012
CLAGYX

PWMCLMGYX 000
TTAA00 KGYX 031520


CLIMATE REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY ME
312 PM EST TUE JAN 9 2018

...................................

...THE GRAY ME CLIMATE SUMMARY FOR THE YEAR OF 2017...

CLIMATE NORMAL PERIOD 1981 TO 2010
CLIMATE RECORD PERIOD 1995 TO 2017

WEATHER         OBSERVED          NORMAL  DEPART  LAST YEAR`S
                 VALUE   DATE(S)  VALUE   FROM    VALUE
                                          NORMAL
.............................................................
TEMPERATURE (F)
RECORD
 HIGH              99   07/22/2011
 LOW              -15   01/15/2004
HIGHEST            95   05/18        93       2       96
LOWEST            -10   12/29        -7      -3      -12
                        12/28
AVG. MAXIMUM     56.0              55.4     0.6     57.0
AVG. MINIMUM     38.5              37.3     1.2     38.8
MEAN             47.2              46.4     0.8     47.9
DAYS MAX >= 90      4               5.3    -1.3        8
DAYS MAX <= 32     54              50.9     3.1       46
DAYS MIN <= 32    139             143.2    -4.2      141
DAYS MIN <= 0       8               7.1     0.9        8

PRECIPITATION (INCHES)
RECORD
 MAXIMUM        71.90   2005
TOTALS          42.01             50.22   -8.21    47.19
DAILY AVG.       0.12              0.14   -0.02     0.13
DAYS >= .01       140             138.6     1.4      139
DAYS >= .10        82              85.3    -3.3       76
DAYS >= .50        31              33.4    -2.4       29
DAYS >= 1.00        9              14.1    -5.1       13
GREATEST
 24 HR. TOTAL    1.71   MM                          4.02

SNOWFALL (INCHES)
RECORDS
 TOTAL          125.2   2008
TOTALS          111.9              83.8    28.1     83.2
SINCE 7/1        24.8              21.4     3.4     36.8
SNOWDEPTH AVG.      4
DAYS >= TRACE      57              33.7               61
DAYS >= 1.0        22              19.3     2.7       21
GREATEST
 SNOW DEPTH        34   02/17                         21
                        02/16
 24 HR TOTAL     16.6   03/14                       16.6

DEGREE_DAYS
HEATING TOTAL    6900              7191    -291     6752
 SINCE 7/1       2547              2666    -119     2500
COOLING TOTAL     532               390     142      607

FREEZE DATES
RECORD
 EARLIEST     09/29/2000
 LATEST       05/11/2010
EARLIEST        11/08           10/14
LATEST          04/19           04/24
..............................................................



-  INDICATES NEGATIVE NUMBERS.
R  INDICATES RECORD WAS SET OR TIED.
MM INDICATES DATA IS MISSING.
T  INDICATES TRACE AMOUNT.

&&

THE YEAR 2017 WAS WARMER AND DRIER THAN NORMAL AT THE NATIONAL
WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE IN GRAY. IT FEATURED A VERY WARM JANUARY, A
SNOWY STRETCH IN FEBRUARY, A MARCH BLIZZARD, A COLD SPRING, A VERY
WARM FALL, HEAVY RAIN AND WINDS IN OCTOBER, AND A VERY COLD DECEMBER.

THE YEAR STARTED OFF WITH 20 INCHES OF SNOW ON THE GROUND LEFTOVER
FROM HEAVY LATE DECEMBER SNOWS, BUT WARM TEMPERATURES AND RAINFALL
QUICKLY ATE AWAY AT THE SNOW DEPTH. SOME COLD AIR ARRIVED IN THE
SECOND WEEK OF JANUARY, BUT THE JANUARY THAW QUICKLY COMMENCED. THE
TEMPERATURE WARMED ALL THE WAY TO 50 DEGREES ON JANUARY 11. ALTHOUGH
SOME MORE LIGHT SNOW AND WINTRY WEATHER WAS OBSERVED DURING THE REST
OF THE MONTH, THE WARMER TEMPERATURES KEPT RETURNING. IN THE MIDDLE
OF FEBRUARY THERE WAS A BREAK FROM THE WARM WEATHER WHEN A SERIES OF
STORM SYSTEMS BROUGHT FREQUENT HEAVY SNOWFALL. MEASURABLE SNOWFALL
FELL ON 8 OUT OF 10 DAYS FROM FEBRUARY 7 THRU 16, INCLUDING 5 DAYS
WITH AT LEAST 6 INCHES OF SNOWFALL. DURING THIS REMARKABLY SNOWY
STRETCH MORE THAN 43 INCHES OF SNOWFALL WAS MEASURED. BUT ALMOST AS
SOON AS THE SNOW ENDED THE WARM WEATHER RETURNED AGAIN, WITH THE
TEMPERATURE RISING TO 57 DEGREES ON FEBRUARY 19, THE WARMEST
TEMPERATURE YET OBSERVED IN THE MONTH OF FEBRUARY. THE REST OF THE
MONTH SAW TEMPERATURES FREQUENTLY IN THE UPPER 40S AND LOW 50S. BUT
A COLD FRONT ON MARCH 2 BROUGHT MUCH COLDER AIR BACK INTO THE AREA.
THE COLD INTENSIFIED IN MID MARCH WHEN THE TEMPERATURE DID NOT RISE
ABOVE FREEZING FOR 7 STRAIGHT DAYS FROM MARCH 10 THRU 16, INCLUDING
2 DAYS FALLING TO ZERO OR COLDER. DURING THE MIDDLE OF THIS REALLY
COLD PERIOD, A STRONG NOR`EASTER BROUGHT MORE THAN 16 INCHES OF
SNOWFALL AND BLIZZARD CONDITIONS ON MARCH 14. TWO OF THE COLDEST
MARCH DAYS ON RECORD WERE RECORDED THIS YEAR WHEN THE HIGH
TEMPERATURE ONLY MADE IT TO 13 DEGREES ON MARCH 4 AND ONLY 12 DEGREES
ON MARCH 12. THE EXTREME COLD GRADUALLY ABATED TOWARD THE END OF
MARCH, BUT ANOTHER SNOWSTORM ARRIVED ON THE EVENING OF MARCH 31 INTO
APRIL 1, DROPPING ANOTHER 14 INCHES OF SNOWFALL.

THE COLD GRADUALLY LOST ITS GRIP, WITH TEMPERATURES WARMING INTO THE
60S FOR 4 STRAIGHT DAYS FROM APRIL 9 THRU 12 INCLUDING 79 DEGREES ON
APRIL 11. THIS WARMTH WAS ENOUGH TO FINALLY MELT THE WINTER SNOW
PACK ON APRIL 12. THE SPRING BECAME A BATTLE BETWEEN BUILDING WARMTH
IN THE INTERIOR OF NORTH AMERICA AND THE COOL, MOIST INFLUENCE OF
THE GULF OF MAINE. THUS MANY DAYS FEATURED COOL TEMPERATURES AND
LIGHT RAINFALL, WHILE THERE WERE A FEW DAYS WHEN THE WARMTH WAS ABLE
TO BREAK THROUGH. SOME OF THOSE WARM DAYS INCLUDING 85 DEGREES ON
EASTER SUNDAY, APRIL 16, 80 DEGREES ON APRIL 29, AND 95 DEGREES ON
MAY 18 (THE HOTTEST TEMPERATURE OF THE YEAR).

BY THE MIDDLE OF JUNE THE WARMER PERIODS BECAME MORE FREQUENT AND
LONG LASTING. THE TEMPERATURE REACHED 90 DEGREES FOR 3 STRAIGHT DAYS
FROM JUNE 11 THRU 13, A SIGN THAT SUMMER WARMTH WAS FINALLY HERE TO
STAY. AFTER A BRIEF COOL DOWN, THE TEMPERATURE TOPPED 80 DEGREES
AGAIN ON 6 OUT OF 7 DAYS FROM JUNE 18 THRU 25. BY THE LATER HALF OF
THE SUMMER, PERSISTENT DRY WEATHER AND LOW HUMIDITY LED TO DAYTIME
TEMPERATURES FREQUENTLY WARMING TO NEAR NORMAL WHILE NIGHTTIME LOW
TEMPERATURES FELL BELOW NORMAL. THE BIGGEST EXCEPTION TO THIS DRY
TREND WAS ON AUGUST 18 WHEN A FRONTAL SYSTEM BROUGHT 1.71 INCHES OF
RAINFALL. A COLD FRONT IN LATE AUGUST BROUGHT SOME COOL, FALL-LIKE
TEMPERATURES THAT LASTED INTO THE FIRST PART OF SEPTEMBER.

BY THE MIDDLE OF SEPTEMBER A RIDGE OF HIGH PRESSURE HAD BUILT UP
OVER THE WESTERN ATLANTIC AND BEGAN PUMPING WARM, HUMID AIR INTO NEW
ENGLAND. THIS BECAME A PERSISTENT FEATURE OF THE WEATHER PATTERN
THROUGH MOST OF THE FALL, AND IT ALLOWED SOME WARM, SUMMER-LIKE
TEMPERATURES TO MAKE A RETURN IN SEPTEMBER. THE WARMEST STRETCH WAS
IN LATE SEPTEMBER WHEN THE TEMPERATURE TOPPED 85 DEGREES FOR 5
STRAIGHT DAYS FROM SEPTEMBER 23 THRU 27. ALTHOUGH OCCASIONAL COLD
FRONTS BRIEFLY PULLED TEMPERATURES BACK, THE WARMTH KEPT RETURNING.
BY THE END OF OCTOBER CHANGE WAS IN THE AIR. TWO STRONG STORM
SYSTEMS BROUGHT HEAVY RAINFALL, WITH THE FIRST DROPPING MORE THAN 3
INCHES OF RAIN FROM OCTOBER 24 THRU 26. THE SECOND BROUGHT ANOTHER
1.5 INCHES OF RAIN AND STRONG WINDS WHICH LED TO SIGNIFICANT WIND
DAMAGE AND POWER OUTAGES THAT IN SOME CASES LASTED THROUGH HALLOWEEN.

AFTER A FEW MORE DAYS OF WARMTH IN EARLY NOVEMBER, INCLUDING 69
DEGREES ON NOVEMBER 3, A COLD FRONT BROUGHT COLDER WEATHER INTO THE
AREA ON THE NOVEMBER 6. THE FIRST FREEZE OF THE SEASON FINALLY
ARRIVED ON NOVEMBER 8. ANOTHER COLD FRONT BROUGHT EVEN COLDER AIR
STRAIGHT OUT OF THE ARCTIC A FEW DAYS LATER, WITH THE TEMPERATURE
BOTTOMING OUT AT 18 DEGREES ON NOVEMBER 11. THE FIRST SNOW OF THE
SEASON CAME ON NOVEMBER 13 WHEN MORE THAN AN INCH WAS MEASURED.
ALTHOUGH THE EXTREME COLD LESSENED, A SERIES OF COLD FRONTS KEPT
BRINGING MORE COLD TEMPERATURES FOR THE REST OF NOVEMBER. AFTER A
BRIEF BREAK IN THE COLD IN EARLY DECEMBER, THE FIRST SIGNIFICANT
SNOWFALL OF THE SEASON CAME ON DECEMBER 9. MORE SNOW AND FREEZING
RAIN CAME ON DECEMBER 12, WITH COLD AIR POURING IN BEHIND THIS
SYSTEM. THE NEXT 7 DAYS DID NOT WARM ABOVE FREEZING. A FEW MORE
STORMS BROUGHT SNOW AND FREEZING RAIN, WITH THE NEXT BIG SNOWSTORM
DROPPING MORE THAN 6 INCHES OF SNOW ON CHRISTMAS MORNING. EVEN
COLDER AIR POURED IN BEHIND THIS STORM, WITH THE LAST 5 DAYS OF THE
YEAR NOT WARMING ABOVE 15 DEGREES WITH NIGHTTIME TEMPERATURES
FREQUENTLY BELOW ZERO. THE TEMPERATURE DROPPED ALL THE WAY TO 10
BELOW ZERO ON DECEMBER 28 AND 29, THE COLDEST TEMPERATURES YET
OBSERVED IN GRAY IN THE MONTH OF DECEMBER.

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE YEAR WAS 47.2 DEGREES WHICH WAS 0.8
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE WARMEST YEAR ON RECORD WAS IN 2010 WHEN
THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE WAS 48.9 DEGREES. THE COLDEST WAS IN 1997
WHEN IT WAS 45.1 DEGREES. THE FOLLOWING TABLE LISTS THE AVERAGE
TEMPERATURE, TOTAL PRECIPITATION, TOTAL SNOWFALL, AND DEPARTURES
FROM NORMAL FOR EACH MONTH OF 2017.

SUMMARY OF TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION BY MONTH FOR 2017...
MONTH      AVERAGE TEMP  PRECIPITATION   SNOWFALL
JANUARY    27.4  (+6.4)  2.98  (-0.55)   8.4   (-12.8)
FEBRUARY   27.6  (+2.9)  3.70  (+0.39)   44.6  (+28.1)
MARCH      27.2  (-5.7)  2.82  (-1.35)   23.1  (+3.2)
APRIL      46.8  (+2.5)  5.00  (+0.62)   11.0  (+6.2)
MAY        53.2  (-1.7)  6.04  (+2.14)   0.0
JUNE       65.7  (+1.6)  3.33  (-0.97)   0.0
JULY       69.9  (+0.5)  1.43  (-2.87)   0.0
AUGUST     68.7  (+0.1)  2.63  (-0.96)   0.0
SEPTEMBER  65.3  (+4.9)  2.57  (-1.62)   0.0
OCTOBER    57.0  (+7.9)  5.66  (+0.52)   0.0
NOVEMBER   36.7  (-1.8)  2.38  (-2.97)   1.2   (-1.8)
DECEMBER   21.1  (-6.2)  3.47  (-0.59)   23.6  (+5.3)
ANNUAL     47.2  (+0.8)  42.01 (-8.21)   111.9 (+28.1)

A TOTAL OF 42.01 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL WHICH WAS 8.21 INCHES
BELOW NORMAL AND THE THIRD CONSECUTIVE BELOW NORMAL YEAR. THERE WERE
9 DAYS WITH AT LEAST 1.00 INCH OF PRECIPITATION OBSERVED, WHICH WAS
5.1 DAYS FEWER THAN NORMAL. THE FOLLOWING TABLE LISTS THE DAYS WHICH
OBSERVED AT LEAST 1.00 INCH OF PRECIPITATION IN 2017.

DAYS WITH AT LEAST 1.00 INCH OF PRECIPITATION
DAY           PRECIPITATION
JANUARY 24    1.43
MARCH 14      1.26
APRIL 6       1.30
APRIL 26      1.17
MAY 26        1.45
AUGUST 18     1.71
OCTOBER 25    1.31
OCTOBER 26    1.62
OCTOBER 30    1.18

SNOWFALL STATISTICS ARE NORMALLY LISTED BY SEASON RATHER THAN BY
CALENDAR YEAR. HOWEVER, 2017 SAW 111.9 INCHES OF SNOWFALL WHICH WAS
28.1 INCHES ABOVE NORMAL. THE HEAVIEST SNOWSTORM WAS ON MARCH 14
WHEN 16.6 INCHES WAS MEASURED. THERE WERE 22 DAYS WITH AT LEAST 1.0
INCH OF SNOWFALL. AT LEAST 6.0 INCHES WAS RECORDED ON 8 DAYS IN
2017. THE FOLLOWING TABLE LISTS THE DAYS WHICH OBSERVED AT LEAST 6.0
INCHES OF SNOWFALL IN 2017.

DAYS WITH AT LEAST 6 INCHES OF SNOWFALL
DAY           SNOWFALL
FEBRUARY 9    7.5
FEBRUARY 11   6.3
FEBRUARY 12   7.6
FEBRUARY 13   6.6
FEBRUARY 15   8.0
MARCH 14      16.6
APRIL 1       10.2
DECEMBER 25   6.6

SNOW DEPTH REACHED ITS PEAK IN MID FEBRUARY AFTER SEVERAL SNOWSTORMS
DROPPED HEAVY SNOWFALL. THE HIGHEST SNOW DEPTH WAS 34 INCHES ON
FEBRUARY 16 AND 17. WARM TEMPERATURES FOR THE LAST HALF OF FEBRUARY
BROUGHT THIS SNOW DEPTH DOWN TO JUST 11 INCHES BY THE END OF THE
MONTH. MORE SNOW IN MARCH AND EARLY APRIL ALLOWED THE WINTER SNOW
PACK TO REMAIN ON THE GROUND UNTIL APRIL 12. THE FIRST SIGNIFICANT
SNOW IN DECEMBER WAS FOLLOWED BY COLD AND MORE SNOW WHICH KEPT THE
SNOW ON THE GROUND THROUGH THE END OF THE YEAR. THERE WERE 124 DAYS
WITH AT LEAST 1 INCH OF SNOW ON THE GROUND, AND A RECORD 116 DAYS
WITH AT LEAST 6 INCHES OF SNOW ON THE GROUND (PREVIOUS RECORD WAS
105 DAYS IN 2001). THERE WERE 54 DAYS WITH AT LEAST 12 INCHES OF
SNOW ON THE GROUND.

$$

KIMBLE



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