Drought Information Statement
Issued by NWS Aberdeen, SD

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AXUS73 KABR 230839
DGTABR
MNC011-155-SDC013-017-021-025-029-031-037-039-041-045-049-051-057-
059-065-069-075-085-089-091-107-109-115-117-119-129-250845-

Drought Information Statement
National Weather Service Aberdeen SD
339 AM CDT Fri Jun 23 2017 /239 AM MDT Fri Jun 23 2017/

...DROUGHT CONDITIONS CONTINUE TO EXPAND AND WORSEN ACROSS THE
REGION, WITH ONLY SPOTTY RELIEF FOR SOME...

SYNOPSIS...

Although episodes of showers and thunderstorms with beneficial
rainfall have occurred across portions of the region the past couple
weeks, only minor relief has been noted for some locations.
Meanwhile, many areas continue to miss out on heavier precipitation,
thus extending the overall dryness that has been ongoing. North
central South Dakota has experienced worsening drought conditions,
with parts of central South Dakota also included.

The United States Drought Monitor has classified a portion of north
central South Dakota in Extreme (D3) drought. This includes eastern
Dewey county, much of Walworth county, extreme southeast Campbell
county, and extreme northwest Potter county.

Severe (D2) drought conditions include the counties of: Corson,
Campbell, McPherson, west-central Brown, Edmunds, western Faulk,
Potter, western and southern Dewey, Sully, northern Hyde, northern
Hughes, and extreme northern Stanley.

Moderate (D1) drought conditions include the counties of: Stanley,
Hughes, Lyman, Buffalo, Hand, eastern Faulk, western and northern
Spink, Brown, Marshall, Day, and western Roberts.

Abnormally dry (D0) conditions buffer the D1 area, and extend
southward across south central South Dakota and into the central
James River valley, then northeast into far west central Minnesota.

SUMMARY OF IMPACTS...

STATE AND LOCAL ACTIONS:
South Dakota governor Dennis Daugaard declared a statewide drought
emergency on June 16th. This declaration eases hay and transportation
restrictions. Farmers and ranchers can cut and bale highway ditches
to keep their livestock fed. The governor`s order also authorizes
producers to travel statewide without a commercial driver`s license
in order to get feed to the drought stricken areas. The South Dakota
Drought Task Force has also been activated.

Six counties are now eligible to receive payments under the Livestock
Forage Program for producers with grazing livestock. These counties
are: Campbell, Dewey, Walworth, Potter, McPherson, and Edmunds.

County burn bans continue to expand and now include most of central
and northeast South Dakota.

SOIL MOISTURE CONDITIONS:
Calculated soil moisture anomalies from June 21st show deficits
across central South Dakota ranging from 60mm to 80mm, which includes
the D2 and D3 drought areas. The June 19th USDA South Dakota Crop
Progress and Condition report indicates topsoil moisture supplies
rated 55 percent short or very short. Subsoil moisture supplies were
rated 55 percent short or very short. These are both slight increases
from about two weeks ago.

AGRICULTURAL IMPACTS:
Spring wheat losses are being reported now. Corn and soybean fields
have showed slow growth, with uneven emergence compared to normal
years. Recent rains were too late for any substantial recovery in
pastures and hayland. Cattle sales continue due to feed shortages and
poor growth in pastures. Water quality continues to be an issue, as
there are some reports of cattle dying due to poor water in drought
areas with high Total Dissolved Solids.

The latest South Dakota Crop Progress and Condition report indicates
Spring wheat condition rated 64 percent poor or very poor. Alfalfa
hay condition rated 73 percent poor or very poor. Barley condition
rated 65 percent poor or very poor. Pasture and range conditions
rated 49 percent poor or very poor. Stock water supplies rated 36
percent short or very short.

RIVER AND STREAM FLOW CONDITIONS:
Seven-day average stream flow compared to historical stream flow is
below normal along the Grand River at Little Eagle, where it is at
the 16th percentile. Below normal conditions are also noted along the
Moreau River near Whitehorse and the Bad River near Fort Pierre,
where they are at the 19th and 17th percentiles, respectively. These
areas coincide with the current D3 and D2 drought areas.

FIRE DANGER IMPACTS:
Several counties have enacted burn bans, which now include most of
central South Dakota and much of northeast South Dakota. The
Grassland Fire Danger has reached HIGH during days of windy and dry
conditions. Several counties are considering regulating fireworks
due to the dry conditions.

CLIMATE SUMMARY...

Parts of north central South Dakota have only seen 25 to 50 percent
of normal precipitation in the past 60 days, with about 50 to 75
percent of normal in the past 90 days. Actual precipitation amounts
across central South Dakota range from about 3 inches to 4.5 inches
below normal since the start of the year.

PRECIPITATION/TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK...

The 8 to 14 day outlook issued on June 22nd from the Climate
Prediction Center forecasts near normal temperatures across the
region, with probabilities for above normal precipitation. The latest
one-month outlook valid for July forecasts probabilities for above
normal temperatures, with equal chances for above or below normal
precipitation.

HYDROLOGIC SUMMARY AND OUTLOOK...

The latest Probabilistic Hydrologic Outlook from the National Weather
Service in Aberdeen shows a less than 20 percent chance for any of
the rivers across the County Warning Area reaching minor flood stage
in the next 90 days.

NEXT ISSUANCE DATE...

This product will be updated around July 20th or sooner if necessary
in response to significant changes in conditions.

&&

RELATED WEB SITES...

Additional information on current drought conditions may be found at
the following web addresses:

US Drought Monitor...http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu
National Integrated Drought Information System...http://www.drought.gov
NOAA Drought Page...http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/Drought
High Plains Regional Climate Center...https://hprcc.unl.edu
Local Weather Information...http://www.weather.gov/abr
USDA Crop Information...http://www.nass.usda.gov/index.asp
South Dakota State Climate Office...https://climate.sdstate.edu
SDSU Extension...http://igrow.org
Drought Impact Reporter...http://droughtreporter.unl.edu/map

ADDITIONAL RIVER INFORMATION...

National Weather Service...http://water.weather.gov
US Geological Survey...https://www.usgs.gov/water
US Army Corps of Engineers...http://www.usace.army.mil

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

The Drought Monitor is a multi-agency effort involving the National
Weather Service and National Centers for Environmental Information,
the USDA, state and regional center climatologists and the National
Drought Mitigation Center. Information for this statement has been
gathered from NWS and FAA observation sites, state cooperative
extension services, the USDA, USACE and USGS.

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS...

If you have questions or comments about this Drought Information
Statement, please contact:

National Weather Service
Travis Tarver
824 Brown County 14S
Aberdeen SD 57401
Phone...605-225-0519
travis.tarver@noaa.gov

$$
TMT



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