Public Information Statement
Issued by NWS Newport/Morehead, NC

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NOUS42 KMHX 091001
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NCZ029-044>047-079>081-090>095-098-103-104-091415-

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Newport/Morehead City NC
601 AM EDT Tue May 9 2017

...HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS WEEK FOR 2017...

All week long the National Weather Service will issue informative
messages to help you prepare for the hurricane season.  Today`s
topics include high winds and secure an insurance check-up.

High winds...
The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale classifies hurricanes into
five categories based on their sustained wind speed at the indicated
time. Hurricanes reaching Category 3 and higher are considered major
hurricanes because of their potential for significant loss of life
and property. Category 1 and 2 storms are still dangerous and
require preventive measures.

It is important that you know your hurricane warning terminology;
the difference between watches and warning:

Hurricane Warning:  An announcement that sustained winds of 74 mph
or higher are expected somewhere within the specified area in
association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone.
Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds
reach tropical storm force, the warning is issued 36 hours in advance
of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds. The warning
can remain in effect when dangerously high water or a combination of
dangerously high water and waves continue, even though winds may be
less than hurricane force.

Hurricane Watch:  An announcement that sustained winds of 74 mph or
higher are possible somewhere within the specified area in
association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone.
Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds
reach tropical storm force, the watch is issued 48 hours in advance
of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.

Tropical Storm Warning:  An announcement that sustained winds of 39
to 73 mph are expected somewhere within the specified area within 36
hours in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical
cyclone.

Tropical Storm Watch:  An announcement that sustained winds of 39 to
73 mph are possible somewhere within the specified area within 48
hours in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical
cyclone.

Keep in mind that even tropical storm force winds of less than 74
mph are capable of tossing around debris and causing damage similar
to that seen in inland areas during Hurricane Fran especially in the
Raleigh area. For this reason, you should seek shelter from the wind
in a sturdy building as the hurricane moves inland and before the
onset of tropical storm force winds. Tropical storm force winds
usually strike hours ahead of the actual hurricane`s eye. For this
reason many emergency officials typically have evacuations completed
and personnel sheltered before the onset of tropical storm force
winds.

Hurricane force winds can easily destroy poorly constructed buildings
and mobile homes. Debris such as signs, roofing material, and items
left outside become flying missiles in high wind. Falling trees cause
extensive damage to power lines, towers and underground water lines.
This can cause extended disruptions of utility services. Damaging
hurricane force winds can be just as devastating as tornadoes.
You can protect windows by installing hurricane shutters or prepare
5/8 of an inch plywood panels. Garage doors are also very susceptible
to high wind and fail frequently in tropical storms and hurricanes
when wind gusts exceed 70 mph. Reinforcing garage doors with
affordable braces significantly increase structural integrity.

Things you can do before a storm threatens include assessing your
home`s landscaping and assess the threat from falling trees. Trim
back any dead limbs as well as large overhanging branches. Pick up
all loose objects around the house including lawn furniture, grills,
and potted plants. Lastly have a plan of where to seek shelter in
your home if high wind threatens you. Talk with your family and let
everyone know where your predetermined safe room is in your home.
Interior hallways, closets and bathrooms are the safest locations.
Always stay away from windows and exterior doors.

Secure an insurance check-up...
Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance
check-up to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair
or even replace your home. Don`t forget coverage for your car or
boat. Remember, standard homeowners insurance doesn`t cover flooding.
Whether you`re a homeowner or renter, you`ll need a separate policy
for it, and it`s available through your company, agent or the
National Flood Insurance Program at www.floodsmart.gov. Act now as
flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.  Finally, know
where your insurance documents and contact information are located,
and be sure to take them with you if you have to evacuate.

For more information about hurricane preparedness, please visit the
following web sites:
* http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/prepare
* http://www.readync.org

$$



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