Drought Information Statement
Issued by NWS Pueblo, CO

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DROUGHT INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
National Weather Service National Weather Service Pueblo Co
735 PM MDT Thu Jun 15 2017

COC003-009-011-015-021-023-025-027-041-043-055-061-065-071-079-089-
099-101-105-109-119-180130-
735 PM MDT Thu Jun 15 2017

...A Wet and Cool May Helps to End Drought across Southeastern Colorado...

SYNOPSIS...

An unsettled weather pattern across the area at the end of April
continued through out most of the month of May across south central
and southeast Colorado. This unsettled weather pattern allowed for
multiple slow moving storm systems to move across the state, which
brought abundant and much needed rain and snow to southern Colorado,
especially the southeast mountains and plains.

With that said, the latest US Drought Monitor, issued Thursday June
15th, 2017, has eliminated drought conditions across all of south central
and southeast Colorado, save for Abnormally Dry (D0) conditions being
depicted across most of Teller County.

www.droughtmonitor.unl.edu/aboutus/classificationscheme.aspx

DROUGHT IMPACTS...

FIRE DANGER...

The abundant and beneficial moisture received over the past few months
has helped to quash fire danger across the area, with fuels across the
area assessed as being none critical. However, with dry, hot and
breezy weather across the area over the past week, fuels are starting
to dry, leading to increasing fire danger once again.

The latest information on fire bans and restrictions can be found at:

www.coemergency.com/p/fire-bans-danger.html

AGRICULTURAL...

The abundant moisture across the region over the past few months has
helped to recharge soil moisture across southeast Colorado. However,
dry, hot and breezy weather over the past week has helped to dry out
top soils, with continued drying of rangeland crops likely over the
next few weeks, before monsoon season begins across the region.

HYDROLOGIC...

June 1st statewide snowpack came in at 200 percent of median and is
around the same percent of snowpack as last year at this same time.
This is due to at late season storm that brought abundant snowfall to
northern Front Range.

In the Arkansas Basin, June 1st snowpack came in at 139 percent of
median, though is only 58 percent of the snowpack at this same time
last year.

In the Rio Grande Basin, June 1st snowpack came in at 156 percent of
median, and is 141 percent of last years snowpack at this same time.

Water storage across the state at the end of May was at 109 percent
of average overall, as compared to 107 percent of average storage
available at this same time last year.

In the Arkansas Basin, end of May storage was at 119 percent of
average overall, as compared to 116 percent of average storage
available at this same time last year. In the Rio Grande Basin,
end of May storage was at 90 percent of average overall, as compared
to 79 percent of average storage available at this same time last
year.

The abundant precipitation over the past few months and late season
snowfall has many area streams and rivers running fast and high
through the melt season.

CLIMATE SUMMARY...

The average temperature in Alamosa through out the month of May was
0.8 degrees below. Alamosa recorded 1.24 inches of precipitation
through the month of May. This was 0.66 inches above normal and makes
May of 2017, tied with May of 1955, as the 9th wettest May on record.
Alamosa recorded 1.1 inches of snow through the month of May, which is
0.2 inches above normal. This brings Alamosa`s 2016-17 seasonal
snowfall total up to 42.2 inches, which is 14.6 inches above normal.

The average temperature in Alamosa through the Spring of 2017 (March,
April, May) was 2.7 degrees above normal, making the Spring of 2017
tied with the Spring of 2004, as the 4th warmest Spring on record.
Alamosa recorded 2.60 inches of precipitation through out the Spring
of 2017. This is 0.90 inches above normal and makes the Spring of 2017
tied with the Spring of 2015, as the 15th wettest Spring on record.
Alamosa recorded 6.7 inches of snow through the Spring of 2017, which
is 2.8 inches below normal.

The average temperature in Colorado Springs through out the month of
May was 0.2 degrees below normal. Colorado Springs recorded 3.15
inches of precipitation and 0.1 inches of snow through out the month
of May, which is 1.12 inches above normal and 0.6 inches below normal,
respectively. This also brings the 2016-17 seasonal snowfall total in
Colorado Springs to 25.2 inches, which is 12.5 inches below normal.

The average temperature in Colorado Springs through the Spring of
2017 (March, April, May) was 3.2 degrees above normal, making the
Spring of 2017 the 5th warmest Spring on record. Colorado Springs
recorded 5.73 inches of precipitation and 11.8 inches of snow through
out the Spring of 2017, which is 1.28 inches above normal and 1.9
inches below normal, respectively.

The average temperature in Pueblo through out the month of May was
1.5 degrees below normal. Pueblo recorded 3.00 inches of precipitation
through out the month of April. This is 1.49 inches above normal and
makes May of 2017 the 14h wettest May on record. Pueblo did not record
any snow through out the month of May, which is 0.5 inches below
normal. This also keeps the 2016-17 seasonal snowfall total in Pueblo
to 28.2 inches, which is 3.6 inches below normal.

The average temperature in Pueblo the Spring of 2017 (March, April,
May) was 2.5 degrees above normal, making the Spring of 2017 tied
with the Spring of 1986, as the 13th warmest Spring on record.
Pueblo recorded 8.14 inches of precipitation through out the Spring
of 2017. This is 4.30 inches above normal and makes the Spring of
2017 the 3rd wettest Spring on record. Pueblo recorded 14.0 inches of
snow through the Spring of 2017, which is 4.0 inches above normal.

Here are a few other statistics for select south central and southeast
Colorado locations, indicating observed precipitation totals and
departure from normals for the past month, past 3 months, past 6
months and past 365 days:

...............PAST........PAST 3......PAST 6.......PAST 365........
...............MONTH.......MONTHS......MONTHS.......DAYS............
...............TOTAL/DEP...TOTAL/DEP...TOTAL/DEP....TOTAL/DEP.......
...............INCHES......INCHES......INCHES.......INCHES..........

ALS Airport    1.24/+0.66  2.60/+0.90  5.53/+2.76   9.05/+1.74
COS Airport    3.15/+1.12  5.73/+1.28  6.80/+1.35  13.54/-3.00
PUB Airport    3.00/+1.49  8.14/+4.30  9.82/+4.95  13.80/+1.23

Lamar          3.87/+1.85  7.24/+3.06  8.53/+3.28  20.01/+4.81
Campo 7S       2.45/+0.35  8.12/+3.69  9.71/+4.08  22.55/+5.59
Walsh 1W       5.53/+3.31 12.43/+7.53 13.95/+7.56  25.14/+5.98
Kim 15NNE      3.39/+1.53 10.34/+5.49 12.38/+5.87  20.85/+4.01
Canon City     1.38/-0.03  4.56/+0.48  6.23/+0.66  12.31/-1.16
Rye 1SW        6.04/+3.82 16.31/+8.62 19.88/+8.44  28.33/+3.22
Westcliffe     2.06/+0.68  5.68/+1.51  7.57/1.63   12.63/-1.92
Walsenburg 1NW 6.37/+4.55 14.90/+8.94 17.71/+8.88  23.38/+5.34
Trinidad       3.21/+1.59  8.14/+3.98 10.18/+4.35  17.59/+1.28
Crestone 2SE   1.54/+0.52  4.02/+0.76  6.87/+2.06  13.67/+0.41
Del Norte 2E   0.68/-0.15  2.48/-0.01  4.77/+0.98   9.39/-1.17
Buena Vista 2S 1.24/+0.17  2.08/-0.69  4.14/+0.26   8.66/-1.93

PRECIPITATION/TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK...

ThE Climate Prediction Center (CPC) outlook across south central and
southeast Colorado for the next two weeks indicates better chances
for above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation. The
outlook for July, August and September indicate a slight nod to warmer
than normal temperatures and equal chances of above, below or near
normal precipitation.

NEXT ISSUANCE DATE...

This product will generally be updated by the second Thursday of
the month, or sooner if necessary, in response to significant
changes in conditions.

&&

RELATED WEB SITES...

Additional informations on current drought conditions may be found at:

www.droughtmonitor.unl.edu

www.weather.gov/pub/localdroughtmonitor

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

The drought monitor is a multi-agency effort involving The National
Drought Mitigation Center, NOAA`s National Weather Service, The USDA
and state and regional center climatologists. Information for this
statement has been gathered from NWS and FAA observation sites,
Colorado Cooperative Extension Services, The USDA, USACE and USGS.

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS...

If you have any questions or comments about this drought information
statement, please contact:

National Weather Service Forest Office
3 Eaton Way
Pueblo, Colorado 81007
Phone: 719-948-9429

or

w-pub.webmaster@noaa.gov

$$



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