Climatological Report (Annual)
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CXUS51 KGYX 092005 CCB
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TTAA00 KGYX 031520


CLIMATE REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY ME
218 PM EST TUE JAN 9 2018

...................................

...THE MANCHESTER CLIMATE SUMMARY FOR THE YEAR OF 2017...

CLIMATE NORMAL PERIOD 1981 TO 2010
CLIMATE RECORD PERIOD 1948 TO 2018

WEATHER         OBSERVED          NORMAL  DEPART  LAST YEAR`S
                 VALUE   DATE(S)  VALUE   FROM    VALUE  DATE(S)
                                          NORMAL
................................................................
TEMPERATURE (F)
RECORD
 HIGH             103   07/22/2011
 LOW              -20   02/13/1967
HIGHEST            97   06/12        97       0       97  08/11
LOWEST             -4   12/29        -5       1      -12  02/14
AVG. MAXIMUM     59.9              58.7     1.2     61.5
AVG. MINIMUM     41.6              39.7     1.9     41.8
MEAN             50.8              49.2     1.6     51.6
DAYS MAX >= 90     13              10.9     2.1       22
DAYS MAX <= 32     35              34.8     0.2       28
DAYS MIN <= 32    123             130.1    -7.1      119
DAYS MIN <= 0       4               3.0     1.0        4

PRECIPITATION (INCHES)
TOTALS          40.85             44.58   -3.73    27.67
DAILY AVG.       0.11              0.12   -0.01     0.08
DAYS >= .01       123             131.1    -8.1      113
DAYS >= .10        81              78.2     2.8       61
DAYS >= .50        26              28.4    -2.4       17
DAYS >= 1.00       10               9.5     0.5        3
GREATEST
 24 HR. TOTAL    2.39   09/06

SNOWFALL (INCHES)
TOTALS           70.2                               50.9
SINCE 7/1        16.0                               23.5
SNOWDEPTH AVG.      1
DAYS >= TRACE      46                                 39
DAYS >= 1.0        17                                 12
GREATEST
 SNOW DEPTH        15   02/16
                        02/13
                        02/14
 24 HR TOTAL     11.7   03/14

DEGREE_DAYS
HEATING TOTAL    5893              6394    -501     5740
 SINCE 7/1       2198              2368    -170     2172
COOLING TOTAL     812               641     171      971
.................................................................

WIND (MPH)
AVERAGE WIND SPEED              6.8
HIGHEST WIND SPEED/DIRECTION    40/120    DATE  10/30
HIGHEST GUST SPEED/DIRECTION    58/140    DATE  10/30

SKY COVER
AVERAGE SKY COVER           0.60

AVERAGE RH (PERCENT)     63

WEATHER CONDITIONS. NUMBER OF DAYS WITH
THUNDERSTORM             16     HEAVY RAIN                23
RAIN                     43     LIGHT RAIN               126
FREEZING RAIN             2     LT FREEZING RAIN           8
HEAVY SNOW                7     SNOW                      19
LIGHT SNOW               42     FOG                      133
FOG W/VIS <= 1/4 MILE    21     HAZE                      52

-  INDICATES NEGATIVE NUMBERS.
R  INDICATES RECORD WAS SET OR TIED.
MM INDICATES DATA IS MISSING.
T  INDICATES TRACE AMOUNT.

&&

THE YEAR 2017 WAS WARMER AND WETTER THAN NORMAL. IT FEATURED A VERY
WARM JANUARY, WILD SWINGS BETWEEN SNOWY AND WARM WEATHER IN
FEBRUARY, A MARCH BLIZZARD, A COLD SPRING, A DRY SUMMER, A VERY WARM
FALL, AND A VERY COLD DECEMBER.

THE YEAR STARTED OFF WITH SOME WARMER THAN NORMAL WEATHER. AFTER A
BRIEF PERIOD OF COLD AND LIGHT SNOW, THE JANUARY THAW COMMENCED. THE
TEMPERATURE REACHED 50 DEGREES FOR 3 STRAIGHT DAYS FROM JANUARY 11
THRU 13, MELTING OFF THE EARLY SEASON SNOW PACK. ALTHOUGH A FEW MORE
LIGHT SNOWFALLS OCCURRED IN THE FOLLOWING WEEKS, THE WARM WEATHER
KEPT RETURNING AND KEPT THE SNOW FROM STICKING AROUND. BY MID
FEBRUARY THERE WAS A SHIFT IN THE WEATHER PATTERN THAT BROUGHT AN
EXCEPTIONAL PERIOD OF COLD AND SNOWY WEATHER. SNOW WAS OBSERVED ON 9
OUT OF 10 DAYS FROM FEBRUARY 7 THRU 16, TOTALLY MORE THAN 22 INCHES.
ALTHOUGH THIS EXTREMELY SNOWY WEATHER WAS EXCEPTIONAL, IT TOO WOULD
NOT LAST LONG. WARM AIR WHICH HAD BEEN BUILDING IN THE CENTER OF
NORTH AMERICA MADE ITS WAY INTO NEW ENGLAND FOR THE LAST HALF OF
FEBRUARY. FROM FEBRUARY 18 THRU MARCH 2 THE TEMPERATURE HIT 50
DEGREES ON 10 DAYS, INCLUDING 5 DAYS IN THE 60S AND EVEN 2 DAYS IN
THE 70S! THIS EXCEPTIONAL WARMTH MELTED THE REMNANTS OF THE MID
FEBRUARY SNOWS. A COLD FRONT ON MARCH 2 BROUGHT AN END TO THE
EXTENDED WARMTH AS MUCH COLDER WINTER-LIKE TEMPERATURES MOVED IN
BEHIND IT. VERY COLD TEMPERATURES PERSISTED FOR MUCH OF THE MONTH OF
MARCH, MAKING MARCH ALMOST AS COLD AS JANUARY! AN INTENSE NOR`EASTER
BROUGHT NEARLY A FOOT OF SNOWFALL AND BLIZZARD CONDITIONS ON MARCH
14. ANOTHER STORM BROUGHT ANOTHER 10 INCHES OF SNOWFALL ON MARCH 31
AND APRIL 1. THIS ULTIMATELY PROVED TO BE THE LAST GASPS OF WINTER
AS MUCH WARMER WEATHER SOON FOLLOWED. THE LAST FREEZE OF THE SEASON
CAME ON APRIL 9.

ALTHOUGH THE WINTER COLD AND SNOW HAD ONLY JUST ENDED, VERY WARM AIR
MOVED INTO THE AREA IN MID APRIL. THE TEMPERATURE WARMED WELL INTO
THE 80S ON APRIL 10 AND 11 AND AGAIN ON EASTER SUNDAY, APRIL 16.
SPRING BECAME A BATTLE BETWEEN THE BUILDING WARMTH IN THE INTERIOR
OF NORTH AMERICA AND THE COOLING INFLUENCE OF THE COLD GULF OF
MAINE. THUS THERE WERE MANY DAYS WITH COOL TEMPERATURES AND LIGHT
RAINFALL, ALONG WITH A FEW PERIODS OF EXCEPTIONAL WARMTH. SOME OF
THE WARMER PERIODS INCLUDED 84 DEGREES ON APRIL 28, 81 ON APRIL 29,
94 DEGREES ON MAY 17 AND 18, AND 87 DEGREES ON MAY 19. BY THE MIDDLE
OF JUNE THE WARMER WEATHER BEGAN TO WIN THE BATTLE WHEN MANCHESTER
SAW A WEEK OF 80 DEGREE WARMTH INCLUDING 3 STRAIGHT DAYS IN THE MID
90S FROM JUNE 11 THRU 13. A COLD FRONT BROUGHT BRIEFLY COOLER
WEATHER BUT THE WARMTH RETURNED FOR ANOTHER WEEK OF 80 DEGREE WARMTH
AT THE END OF JUNE. MANCHESTER SAW ANOTHER 3 STRAIGHT DAYS OF 90
DEGREE HEAT FROM JULY 19 THRU 21. A COLD FRONT ON JULY 23 BROUGHT
COOLER CONDITIONS AND ALSO BROUGHT A SLIGHT SHIFT IN THE WEATHER
PATTERN. THE REST OF THE SUMMER SAW MOSTLY DRY CONDITIONS WITH LOW
HUMIDITY. THIS ALLOWED DAYTIME HIGH TEMPERATURES TO WARM TO NEAR
NORMAL LEVELS, INCLUDING MANY DAYS IN THE 80S AND A FEW 90S, WITH
NIGHTTIME LOW TEMPERATURES OFTEN BELOW NORMAL. THE BIGGEST EXCEPTION
TO THIS DRY LATE SUMMER TREND WAS ON AUGUST 18 WHEN A FRONTAL SYSTEM
BROUGHT NEARLY 2 INCHES OF RAINFALL. SOME COOLER FALL-LIKE
TEMPERATURES CAME IN LATE AUGUST AND LASTED INTO EARLY SEPTEMBER.

BY THE MIDDLE OF SEPTEMBER, A RIDGE OF HIGH PRESSURE OVER THE
WESTERN ATLANTIC BEGAN PUMPING WARM, HUMID AIR INTO NEW ENGLAND.
MANCHESTER SAW 80 DEGREE WARMTH FOR 7 STRAIGHT DAYS FROM SEPTEMBER
11 THRU 17, WITH ANOTHER EVEN WARMER STRETCH OF WEATHER ARRIVING AT
THE END OF THE MONTH. THE TEMPERATURE ON SEPTEMBER 24 WARMED ALL THE
WAY TO 90 DEGREES FOR THE LAST TIME IN 2017. ALTHOUGH THE EXTREME
WARMTH CAME TO AN END, THE WESTERN ATLANTIC RIDGE KEPT WARM
TEMPERATURES FLOWING INTO NEW ENGLAND THROUGH THE MONTH OF OCTOBER.
THE TEMPERATURE TOPPED 70 DEGREES ON 16 DAYS DURING OCTOBER. BY THE
END OF OCTOBER THINGS BEGAN TO CHANGE. TWO STRONG STORM SYSTEMS
BROUGHT HEAVY RAINFALL. THE FIRST BROUGHT MORE THAN 3 INCHES OF
RAINFALL FROM OCTOBER 24 THRU 26. THE SECOND BROUGHT ANOTHER 2
INCHES OF RAIN WITH STRONG WINDS GUSTING TO 58 MPH. THESE WINDS
CAUSED WIND DAMAGE IN THE REGION WITH SOME POWER OUTAGES LASTING
THROUGH HALLOWEEN.

AFTER A FEW MORE WARM DAYS IN EARLY NOVEMBER, INCLUDING 74 DEGREES
ON NOVEMBER 3, A COLD FRONT BROUGHT A SHIFT TO COLDER WEATHER ON
NOVEMBER 6. THE FIRST FREEZE OF THE SEASON FINALLY ARRIVED ON
NOVEMBER 8, AND ANOTHER COLD FRONT BROUGHT EVEN COLDER AIR STRAIGHT
OUT OF THE ARCTIC A FEW DAYS LATER WHEN THE TEMPERATURE DROPPED ALL
THE WAY TO 20 DEGREES ON NOVEMBER 11. ALTHOUGH THE EXTREME COLD
LESSENED, A SERIES OF COLD FRONTS KEPT TEMPERATURES BELOW NORMAL FOR
MOST OF NOVEMBER. AFTER A BRIEF BREAK FROM THE COLD IN EARLY
DECEMBER, THE FIRST SIGNIFICANT SNOWFALL OF THE SEASON CAME ON
DECEMBER 9 WHEN 6 INCHES OF SNOW FELL. MORE SNOW AND FREEZING RAIN
CAME ON DECEMBER 12, WITH MORE COLD AIR POURING IN BEHIND THIS
SYSTEM. THE NEXT 7 DAYS DID NOT RISE ABOVE FREEZING. MORE LIGHT SNOW
AND FREEZING RAIN CAME ON DECEMBER 18 AND AGAIN ON DECEMBER 22 AND
23. THEN NEARLY 5 INCHES OF SNOW FELL ON CHRISTMAS MORNING WITH MORE
BRUTAL COLD AIR MOVING IN BEHIND THE CHRISTMAS STORM. THE REST OF
THE YEAR DID NOT WARM ABOVE FREEZING. IN FACT, THE LAST 5 DAYS OF
THE YEAR DID NOT RISE ABOVE 20 DEGREES WITH NIGHTTIME TEMPERATURES
OFTEN BELOW ZERO.

OVERALL MANCHESTER WAS WARMER AND DRIER THAN NORMAL IN 2017. THE
FOLLOWING TABLE SHOWS THE MONTH BY MONTH BREAKDOWN OF AVERAGE
TEMPERATURE, PRECIPITATION, AND SNOWFALL INCLUDING DEPARTURES FROM
NORMAL WHEN AVAILABLE.

SUMMARY OF TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION BY MONTH FOR 2017...
MONTH      AVERAGE TEMP  PRECIPITATION   SNOWFALL
JANUARY    31.4  (+7.0)   1.55  (-1.47)   6.9
FEBRUARY   33.3  (+5.3)   2.11  (-0.67)  23.9
MARCH      31.5  (-4.5)   3.33  (-1.00)  17.9
APRIL      51.4  (+4.1)   3.67  (-0.19)   5.5
MAY        56.9  (-1.2)   5.25  (+1.20)   0.0
JUNE       68.8  (+1.6)   4.21  (+0.42)   0.0
JULY       72.4  (-0.1)   2.46  (-1.34)   0.0
AUGUST     70.2  (-0.8)   4.12  (+0.49)   0.0
SEPTEMBER  67.5  (+4.9)   4.27  (+0.46)   0.0
OCTOBER    59.6  (+8.8)   6.87  (+2.71)   0.0
NOVEMBER   40.1  (-1.4)   1.05  (-4.07)   0.1
DECEMBER   26.0  (-4.4)   1.96  (-1.32)  15.9
ANNUAL     50.8  (+1.6)   40.85 (-3.73)  70.2

THERE WERE 10 DAYS IN 2017 THAT RECORDED AT LEAST 1.00 INCH OF
PRECIPITATION, ONLY ABOUT 0.5 DAYS ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WERE ALSO 3
DAYS THAT RECORDED AT LEAST 6 INCHES OF SNOWFALL. THE FOLLOWING
TABLES LIST THE DATES WHICH RECORDED 1.00 INCH OF PRECIPITATION OR
6.0 INCHES OR MORE OF SNOWFALL.

DAYS WITH AT LEAST 1.00 INCH OF PRECIPITATION
DAY           PRECIPITATION
MARCH 14      1.12
APRIL 1       1.06
MAY 2         1.00
MAY 26        1.30
JUNE 6        1.34
AUGUST 18     1.94
SEPTEMBER 3   1.36
SEPTEMBER 6   2.39
OCTOBER 25    1.88
OCTOBER 29    1.51

DAYS WITH AT LEAST 6 INCHES OF SNOWFALL
DAY           SNOWFALL
FEBRUARY 9    8.5
MARCH 14      11.7
DECEMBER 9    6.2

HISTORICAL RECORDS AT MANCHESTER ARE NOT PROVIDED DUE TO NUMEROUS
MISSING YEARS WITHIN THE HISTORICAL RECORD. ALTHOUGH THE EARLIEST
DATA AVAILABLE IS IN 1885, THERE ARE SIGNIFICANT GAPS IN THE DATA. A
LOCAL STUDY HAS YET TO BE COMPLETED TO DETERMINE IF MEANINGFUL
INFORMATION ON EXTREME TEMPERATURE, PRECIPITATION, OR SNOWFALL CAN
BE REPORTED. NORMAL VALUES REPORTED ARE CONSIDERED BEST ESTIMATES.

$$

KIMBLE



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