Flood Potential Outlook
Issued by NWS Atlanta, GA

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Hydrologic Outlook
National Weather Service Peachtree City GA
237 PM EDT Sat Apr 21 2018

...PERIODS OF HEAVY RAIN AND ISOLATED FLASH FLOODING EXPECTED LATE
SUNDAY AND MONDAY...

.RAINFALL EXPECTED...
Storm total rainfall amounts of 2.5 to 4 inches are possible for
portions of north and central Georgia late Sunday through Monday.
Locally higher amounts can be expected. Heavy rain is expected at
times and could accumulate quickly. As a result, isolated flash
flooding is expected.

.SYNOPSIS...
A strong low pressure system will move eastward over the lower
Mississippi Valley Sunday. Moist southerly flow will increase
precipitable water values over the region which will help to
produce moderate to heavy rainfall rates as the system slowly
moves over the area through Monday. The highest rainfall amounts
are expected to set up along the I-85 corridor, but given the
range in model solutions, this axis could easily change over the
next 24 hours.

.ANTECEDENT CONDITIONS...
Portions of north and central Georgia have seen 2 to 3 inches of
rainfall over the last seven days. These amounts are 200 to 400
percent above normal. However, these rainfall amounts occurred
early in the week and prevailing sunny conditions have allowed
soils to dry and streamflows to return to normal or below normal
levels. As a result, flash flooding threat with these predicted
rainfall amounts is not quite as high, but isolated flash flooding
is still expected.

.IMPACTS...
Isolated flash flooding is expected, particularly where heavy
rain repeatedly moves over the same area, or if heavy downpours
result in high rainfall amounts over a short period of time.
Also, storm drains and ditches may become quickly overwhelmed or
clogged with debris and cause extensive street flooding and road
ponding.

Minor flooding of some of the larger creeks or rivers is more
likely with the expected storms total rainfall amounts in north
and central Georgia and should be monitored closely.

A Flash Flood Watch is likely to be issued before Sunday
afternoon. Stay alert for future Watches and Warnings that may
be issued over the next several days. Know what to do if a warning
is issued and you live near a creek or river.

For additional hydrologic information, visit our website at
weather.gov/atlanta. Click on the Rivers and Lakes tab under
current weather to access the latest river stage and
precipitation information.

$$

Belanger



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