Drought Information Statement
Issued by NWS Aberdeen, SD

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AXUS73 KABR 191736
DGTABR
MNC011-155-SDC013-017-021-025-029-031-037-039-041-045-049-051-057-
059-065-069-075-085-089-091-107-109-115-117-119-129-261745-

Drought Information Statement
National Weather Service Aberdeen SD
1236 PM CDT Thu May 19 2022 /1136 AM MDT Thu May 19 2022/

...DROUGHT REMAINS IN PLACE OVER CENTRAL SOUTH DAKOTA, BUT
IMPROVEMENTS ARE NOTED...

.SYNOPSIS:

.Drought Intensity and Extent: According to the May 19th release of
the U.S. Drought Monitor, Severe (D2) drought conditions remain in
place across Dewey, Stanley, Jones, and western Lyman counties.
Although, this area of D2 drought has shrunk in size over the past
month thanks to recent rainfall. Moderate (D1) drought conditions are
in place across northern Dewey, Lyman, and western portions of Sully,
Potter, and Hughes counties. The D1 drought area has also shrunk in
size considerably over the past month.

The percentage of the Aberdeen forecast area experiencing Severe (D2)
drought or worse is at 14.98 percent. This is a decrease of around 15
percent from a month ago, when this number was at 29.91 percent.

.Precipitation: Much of the region has been in a wet pattern during
April and thus far in May. Although, the majority of rainfall has
occurred east of the Missouri River, with portions of western and
central South Dakota missing out on beneficial rain. Over the past 60
days, there has been a surplus of moisture from north central South
Dakota eastward across northeast South Dakota into west central
Minnesota. Amounts have been anywhere from 150 to 200 percent of
normal. On the other hand, deficits are showing up across Stanley and
Jones counties, which actually go even further back to longer term
levels. The 60-day deficits are anywhere from 50 to 70 percent of
normal across those two counties, which has prevented removal of
drought conditions.

.Temperatures: During the month of April, temperatures were well
below normal across the region, running anywhere from 2 to 6 degrees
below average for most locations. Thus far in May it`s been a
different story, as many areas are 2 to 3 degrees above normal.

.Hydrologic conditions: Many of the area rivers and streams are
showing 7-day average streamflows above or well above normal due to
the wet pattern over the past month-plus. Although, across central
South Dakota in the area remaining in D1 and D2 drought, the Bad
River near Fort Pierre is only at the 5th percentile, or much below
normal.

.SUMMARY OF IMPACTS:

.Agricultural Impacts: The May 16th release of the South Dakota crop
conditions from the National Agricultural Statistics Service showed
topsoil moisture rated 28 percent short or very short. This is an
improvement of 32 percent compared to one month ago. Subsoil moisture
was rated 40 percent short or very short. This is 22 percent better
than conditions reported one month ago.

.Hydrologic Impacts: There has been somewhat of a recharge to stock
ponds in areas that have received heavy rainfall over the past month.
Although, many are still showing low water across western and into
central South Dakota.

.Fire Hazards: The overall fire danger has dropped considerably as
the area is well into spring green-up.

.DROUGHT MITIGATION ACTIONS: None known at this time.

.LOCAL DROUGHT OUTLOOK: The latest one-month outlook from the Climate
Prediction Center, issued May 19th, leans above normal for
temperatures across southern South Dakota, while precipitation leans
below normal across southwest South Dakota. The latest 3-month
outlook leans above average for temperatures and below average for
precipitation.

.NEXT ISSUANCE DATE: This product will be updated in June.

.RELATED WEB SITES: Additional information on current drought
conditions may be found at the following web addresses:

US Drought Monitor: https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu
US Drought Information System: https://www.drought.gov
Climate Prediction Center: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov
High Plains Regional Climate Center...https://www.hprcc.unl.edu
Local Weather Information...https://www.weather.gov/abr
USDA Crop Information...https://www.nass.usda.gov/index.asp
South Dakota State Climate Office...https://climate.sdstate.edu
SDSU Extension...https://extension.sdstate.edu
Drought Impact Reporter...https://droughtreporter.unl.edu/map

Additional water and river information:

NWS: https://water.weather.gov
OWP: https://water.noaa.gov
US Geological Survey (USGS): https://water.usgs.gov
US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE): https://www.usace.army.mil

.ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: The Drought Monitor is a multi-agency effort
involving the National Weather Service and National Centers for
Environmental Information, the USDA, state and regional center
climatologists and the National Drought Mitigation Center.
Information for this statement has been gathered from NWS and FAA
observation sites, state cooperative extension services, the USDA,
USACE and USGS.

.CONTACT INFORMATION: If you have questions or comments about this
Drought Information Statement, please contact:

National Weather Service
Travis Tarver - Drought Focal Point
824 391st Ave S
Aberdeen SD 57401
Phone: 605-225-0519
Email: travis.tarver@noaa.gov

$$
TMT


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