Climatological Report (Monthly)
Issued by NWS Juneau, AK

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734
CXAK57 PAJK 021112
CLMAJK
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JUNEAU AK
225 AM AKDT WED JUN 02 2021

...................................

...THE JUNEAU CLIMATE SUMMARY FOR THE MONTH OF MAY 2021...

CLIMATE NORMAL PERIOD: 1991 TO 2020
CLIMATE RECORD PERIOD: 1936 TO 2021

WEATHER         OBSERVED          NORMAL  DEPART   LAST YEAR`S
                VALUE   DATE(S)   VALUE   FROM     VALUE DATE(S)
                                          NORMAL
................................................................
TEMPERATURE (F)
RECORD
 HIGH             82   05/27/1947
 LOW              25   05/01/1972
                       05/11/1965
                       05/02/1956
HIGHEST           63   05/18         70      -7
                       05/20
LOWEST            33   05/02         32       1
                       05/18
AVG. MAXIMUM    53.5               57.6    -4.1
AVG. MINIMUM    41.7               40.3     1.4
MEAN            47.6               49.0    -1.4
DAYS MAX >= 90     0                0.0     0.0
DAYS MAX <= 32     0                0.0     0.0
DAYS MIN <= 32     0                2.1    -2.1
DAYS MIN <= 0      0                0.0     0.0

PRECIPITATION (INCHES)
RECORD
 MAXIMUM        9.20   1992
 MINIMUM        0.52   2015
TOTALS          6.91               3.51    3.40
DAILY AVG.      0.22               0.11    0.11
DAYS >= .01       25               16.1     8.9
DAYS >= .10       16                9.0     7.0
DAYS >= .50        3                1.9     1.1
DAYS >= 1.00       1                0.4     0.6
GREATEST
 24 HR. TOTAL   1.52   05/30 TO 05/31

SNOWFALL (INCHES)
RECORDS
 TOTAL           1.2   1964
 SNOW DEPTH        0
TOTALS           0.0                0.0     0.0      0.0
SINCE 7/1       97.4               87.6     9.8     73.4
SNOWDEPTH AVG.     0                                 0.0
DAYS >= TRACE      0                0.0     0.0      0.0
DAYS >= 1.0        0                0.0     0.0      0.0
GREATEST
 SNOW DEPTH        0                                   0

DEGREE DAYS
HEATING TOTAL    532                498      34
 SINCE 7/1      7856               8024    -168
COOLING TOTAL      0                  0       0
 SINCE 1/1         0                  0       0

FREEZE DATES
EARLIEST                        09/27
LATEST                          05/06
................................................................

WIND (MPH)
AVERAGE WIND SPEED              7.9
HIGHEST WIND SPEED/DIRECTION    26/110    DATE  05/31
HIGHEST GUST SPEED/DIRECTION    34/120    DATE  05/31


WEATHER CONDITIONS. NUMBER OF DAYS WITH
THUNDERSTORM              0     MIXED PRECIP               0
HEAVY RAIN                3     RAIN                       8
LIGHT RAIN               26     FREEZING RAIN              0
LT FREEZING RAIN          0     HAIL                       0
HEAVY SNOW                0     SNOW                       0
LIGHT SNOW                0     SLEET                      0
FOG                      18     FOG W/VIS <= 1/4 MILE      1
HAZE                      0

-  INDICATES NEGATIVE NUMBERS.
R  INDICATES RECORD WAS SET OR TIED.
MM INDICATES DATA IS MISSING.
T  INDICATES TRACE AMOUNT.

$$

***Cooler than Normal Temperatures and a Mixed Bag for
Precipitation***

May saw cooler than normal average temperatures. Daytime
temperatures across the panhandle would struggle to reach into the
60s throughout the month. Persistent cloudiness would keep down
those daytime highs, but this would also serve to limit just how low
the temperatures would drop at night, keeping those minimum
temperatures near normal. Among our climate sites, Sitka ended the
month with an average temp of 47.7, or -0.4 below normal; Juneau had
an average temperature of 47.6 which was -1.4 degrees below normal;
Ketchikan came in at 49 which was -1.1 degrees below normal; and
Yakutat, where the warmest temperature of the month was a paltry 54,
had an average temp of 44.1, -1.5 below normal.

The situation regarding precipitation was truly dependent upon
location. Most of the panhandle saw above normal values in the
monthly totals and through the Icy Strait corridor into Juneau and
coastal areas of Baranof Island, many locations reached their normal
monthly amounts of rain around mid-month. The 20th and 21st would
see substantial rainfall as a front with an atmospheric river ahead
of it swept through the region. Yakutat would get the brunt of the
precipitation, recording 1.77 on the 20th. While impressive, this
total still fell well short of a daily record. Other locations of
the central and northern panhandle saw two day totals ranging from
around 0.5 to 1.5 inches while areas farther south were largely
missed. The month ended with a series of systems that would drench
the region, punctuated by a series of rather robust waves to close
out the final day of the month. Despite receiving an incredible
2.48" on the 31st, Ketchikan still came in 2.36 inches below normal
for the month. The other climate sites stacked up as follows: Sitka
received 5.1 which is +1.29" over normal; Yakutat with 11.67 which
is 3.82" above normal - the first time in many months that Yakutat
saw greater than normal monthly precipitation. Juneau recorded the
second wettest May on record with 6.91, or nearly double the normal
value for what is supposed to be one of the driest months of the
year for the Capital City.

After much quality control, our partners at the National Center for
Environmental Information released the new 30-year statistics to
include the previous decade (1991-2020). Climate trends indicate
modest warming for Yakutat, Sitka, and Ketchikan. For Juneau,
however, a modest decrease in average annual overnight lows offset
an equally modest increase in daytime highs, resulting in zero
change for daily mean temperatures. Changes in annual precipitation
were mixed, with Juneau and Ketchikan seeing significant increases
while Sitka and Yakutat registered decreasing annual precipitation.
Interestingly, Juneau actually recorded a modest increase in annual
snowfall and this was probably a result of a very small reduction in
average temperatures during the cold season combined with increased
overall annual precipitation.

-JDR

$$



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